Dr. Claud Anderson – ‘The State of Black America’

Posted: April 18, 2017 in Uncategorized

It’s important in a failing economy that black people educate ourselves about our sad financial state.

None of the things listed below represent real wealth:

  • Fancy cars and homes (we don’t manufacture or build or whose value we don’t control)
  • designer clothing, purses, and shoes by designers who don’t want us to represent their products
  • Fancy nails, toes, and permed or weaved hair that fattens the pockets of Koreans and Arabs who do not bring those dollars back to our community — they don’t buy ANYTHING from us and never will
  • Multiple credit cards (charging anywhere from 8 to 29 percent interest) from white-owned banks.
  • Or eating out in fancy restaurants that may or may not hire us — while the majority of our “restaurants” are little more than storefront takeout ribs and chicken joints or soul food. With the huge variety of cuisine, much of which we feast upon, why do we limit ourselves to the three stereotypes when it comes to opening our own restaurants? Because we see ourselves and other blacks as stereotypes. Deny it if you will…

Bottom line, we are NOT producers, we are rabid consumers who live to consume and lose what little wealth we might possess by buying things we don’t need — and can’t afford.

Even investing in the stock markets means enriching white companies that increasingly will not hire us.

What are we thinking?

The problem is we aren’t.

We are a talented people with many skills yet our fear of success (not failure), and our lack of generational experience as business owners and the resources that come from generational wealth have damaged our ability to believe we can be successful in business.

We are operating on the fumes fueled by ego NOT by knowledge. It is time to change that dynamic.

I have watched far too many black businesses fail because the owners did not do their homework, did not know basic business principles and refused to learn them, or what will sell in today’s market and what people are buying or not buying.

As an example, a new storefront business opened near me that sold overpriced clothing  in an economy where big retailers with all their resources, huge advertising budgets, and marketing expertise cannot sell their clothes.

I went into the store and I tried to feel positive but I had that familiar sinking feeling that they were doomed to fail but I wished them the best. This small black business didn’t last out the year before their business closed its doors.

Something must change if we are going to survive in this nation.

What will we do when the jobs dry up?

How will we generate our own jobs and pass those along to our children?

Something must change.

We must change the way we think, speak and do.

This video is worth a listen:  If you think it’s worth sharing, please do it!

Comments
  1. Trojan Pam says:

    I will be the first to leave a comment by admitting that I am also “guilty” — if that is the right word — for being MORE of a consumer than a producer. I tried many home-based businesses over the years — mail order, photographic business cards, flea market seller, A.L. Williams multi-level marketer of insurance (for which I left a good government job, bragging about not working for anyone else (and a year later I was relieved to find another “good government job.”)

    My last “venture” so to speak was writing four counter-racist books which I sell and promote on this blog and to be honest, those types of books don’t sell very well SO I have to keep a job to make ends meet and a roof over my head.

    Ah well… .

    Over the years, I ran up credit cards for things I didn’t need (and some things I never wore or used). Things I didn’t have the cash to pay for meant I couldn’t afford it, but I ignored that nagging feeling that I was messing up and continued using cards to finance my lifestyle, knowing another paycheck was right around the corner.

    A word to the wise and not so wise:

    Anything that requires credit because you don’t have the cash to pay for it (other than big purchases like homes and cars) probably means you CAN’T AFFORD IT (and might not NEED it).

    I finally got myself down to a small amount of debt but even that amount is like a milestone around my neck. I hate debt now, but I know that a shift in attitude could send me right back to using cards again, but I seriously doubt that will happen because it’s hard to owe so many people money when you hardly have enough for yourself.

    Now, some of you may be able to afford a lot of debt due to your income but JUST THINK about how those dollars could be better put to use than buying stuff you don’t need.

    II know it’s nice to live in a big pretty house full of nice things with a TV in darn near every room, and carry an overpriced I Phone (that cost Apple less than $20 to make using slave labor), and drive a really nice car, and wear clothes and shoes and carry purses with rich white people’s names on it (who don’t appreciate your business), and sit in nice restaurants feeling all prosperous among people who wonder what you’re doing there (??) and staying in nice hotels (i admit I love a nice hotel room!)

    but at the end of the day, who really gives a flying (I won’t say the last word)?

    People really don’t care what you wear and drive and live in (they really don’t)

    And after you get those two to five seconds of envy you think you’re getting from strangers, nobody’s thinking about you or your car or your clothes or your house except those who are secretly hoping you lose it all.

    Are those the people you are busting your butt trying to impress?

    Because the need to impress is a sign of self-esteem damage and growing up BLACK will do a number on your self-esteem, making you super self-conscious of the image you present — good or bad — to the world. Totally understandable. I suffer from it, too,

    What troubles me most is not JUST how we spend our money (consumers) but that we don’t PRODUCE anything and some of us never think about what a precarious and dangerous position that is.

    That makes us a PERMANENTLY DEPENDENT CLASS OF PEOPLE who cannot feed or clothe or supply even our most BASIC NEEDS

    and that is NOTHING to be proud of. In fact, it should scare the S out of us

    but it doesn’t.

    I hope that something Dr. Anderson says will be a spark to thinking differently. I am going to post more videos like his in the hopes that some seeds will be planted

    We (and that includes ME) must stop being the planet’s biggest CASH COWS — meaning we are the most exploited and disrespected and disenfranchised consumer class on the PLANET — blacks who live in America.

    We can do better. We built BLACK WALL STREET, an economic miracle of the early 20th century with our own movie theaters, homes and businesses (that WE built ) and this happened shortly after 400 years of slavery. We were totally SELF-SUFFICIENT. If you’ve never heard of it, google it.

    Now, in 2017, we are trapped in a different kind of SLAVERY, one of mind, body and spirit that is guided by MATERIAL THINGS WE DO NOT PRODUCE.

    IT IS TIME TO CHANGE OUR FOCUS from being CONSUMERS to PRODUCERS and to find a way to circulate our dollars among our own communities — which means black business people MUST LEARN HOW TO BE better business people who respect their customers and offer great service and products.

    The same way some of us do for the white businesses we work for.

    as my post is long enough, I’ll leave it at that

    • Hi Pam, thanks and love for the post. Cynic or realist, I’ve long ago come to the conclusion that it is going to be the tiny minority of us that are going to do the work of opening up the correct smartly run businesses and see that a strong business community is a part of a larger vision. Those few individuals will be the example for the next generation.

      I am constantly reminded of Amos Wilson who told us that we need to build Our own schools to raise Our chidlren to solve Our problems and not someone else’s. Often when I try to talk to others about our collective responsibility to bring about Justice, eyes roll back in the head or I see the “lights” go off upstairs….so it seems that it will be the few that will get serious, plan and do the work.

      These schools and institutions should remove this materialism by instilling a sense of collective responsiblity and patience

      • Trojan Pam says:

        @ spiritofacabral

        I agree.

        What I’m saying is nothing new. Many better qualified people have been talking about black economics for over a half century.

        Unfortunately, after integration, many black people felt there was no need for black self-sufficiency, that white people would willingly provide whatever we needed. We didn’t understand the high price we would pay for being totally dependent on them or anyone else.

        You’re right, only a small minority will do the work that is needed.

        My hope is that my posts will spark a change in thinking and that that small minority will grow a bit larger.

    • I think we need another Black Wall Street. But we have to believe in ourselves and pool our resources together. We need the confidence to believe we can do it without the help of white folks. So many of us don’t believe in self reliance but that’s what we need. We can’t rely on our open enemy to help us get out of this situation. Helping us doesn’t benefit them so it’s senseless to look for them for guidance.

      • Trojan Pam says:

        @ Kushite Prince

        I think we’ve moved way past the point of having another Black Wall Street. The only option for independence in my opinion is a separate black nation. We have to leave this system and in a global system that will be very difficult–but not impossible

        I agree with Diary of a Negress

        there is so much black people can do that we refuse to do. We don’t even want to entertain the conversation.

        And we must overcome our self-esteem issues and our anti-blackness BEFORE we can do anything resembling unity. We don’t trust each and for good reason. We don’t treat each other well in general.

        I don’t have the answers but I do know it all begins with the person in the mirror.

      • reality_check says:

        Yes, Kushite, we do need another black Wall Street…but we also need a means to protect what we’ve built; otherwise, what’s the point?

        • I’ve said the same thing before. We need our own military. We need tanks,guns,military training,nuclear weapons,etc.. We have to protect what we’ve built. I agree with you 100%!

  2. Kimberly says:

    Hello Pam, thanks for the post. As I was reading I said to myself “we have been told” down through the centuries and yet we still refuse to get the lesson.

  3. Mr. Mitchell says:

    I will never understand why black males (many of whom, by the way, struggle financially) pay an obscene amount of money on Jordan sneakers that are mass produced using the cheapest materials available. Ironically, however, owning a pair of cheap but expensive sneakers is a sign of social status. And if we’re being honest, that’s why black males make such purchase: To communicate to the world that they are worthy of who knows what. The amount of care and pride that these black males concentrate on these sneakers are laughable; I see it all the time here in NYC. If you’re going to spend that kind of money on sneakers, they better be good quality fashionable orthapeadics because at least they provide mechanical support and comfort for your feet that’ll last well over a year. Get your money’s worth.

    I will never understand why black males are so willing to purchase sports jerseys, giving their dollars to corporate franchises, just to wear another man’s name emblazoned across their backs. Of what benefit is it to you to proudly wear another man’s name across the top of your back? Of what benefit is it to you to pay a corporate franchise to advertise and market their company? Why in the world would you pay a billion dollar corporation to work for them? Lol. You got it backwards! If you’re going to promote a billion dollar franchise by donning their jerseys and baseball caps, make sure they cut you a piece of their quarterly profits; otherwise, don’t pay a penny to don their paraphernalia in public. What a waste of money! Don’t get pimped! Wake up!

    Do you know how liberating it is to not keep up with the Jones’? Do you know what it feels like to not harbor the need to impress people who are indifferent to you at best and hate you at worst by spending money you cannot afford to spend? Life is made a little more beautiful by not harboring such pernicious sentiments. Focus and clarity will overtake you. A modicum of will to combat racism/white supremacy will kick in.

    • Trojan Pam says:

      @ Mr. Mitchell

      I share the same frustration. The problem is many black youth (and adults) have such serious self-esteem deficits, they must rely on external, material things.

      And the TV/movies/rap videos/multi-million dollar athletes are their role models — all by design.

      It is NO ACCIDENT that these black athlete and entertainers are paid millions of dollars.

      They certainly aren’t worth it. I don’t care what anyone says

      they are certainly not worth more than a doctor or a teacher, not in my book.

      I believe they are paid this money to attract the money-hungry, cash-poor audiences.

      and more importantly, to limit the aspirations of black youth to “entertainment” KNOWING most won’t make a dime and will forfeit an education in pursuit of “hoop” or “rap’ dreams of stardom.

      I totally agree. It is liberating to NOT keep up with the Jones. I know it’s a gre3at feeling to almost be free of credit card debt.

  4. Excellent as always, Miss Pam!

    We’re islanders so a do-it-for-yourself attitude runs deep. I’m self employed and have had my own business since about the age of 16. I began making cookies and cakes and selling them to my classmates. We grow produce and cook them right in our backyard.

    I learned to sew and now make full wardrobes including underwear, winter coats and sleepwear. Caring about the latest style was never my thing so impressing people was never on my list. In fact, because I make my own clothes, people often came up to me and ask me where I bought my dresses, pants and headwraps.

    My guilty pleasure, when I had money, was traveling.

    I’d spend money on beautiful bed and breakfasts in the countryside of Maine, Utah, Oregon and Napa Valley, CA. Wine tasting, wheels of cheese and homemade jam was my thing. I didn’t blink to drop 90.00 on a good bottle of Red with lamb and brown rice.
    Once I rented a tiny cabin in Vermont and got trapped in a terrible blizzard. It was magical to spend 3 days in front of a roaring fire with no distractions and good hot chocolate.

    Once I realized that money could be used for more lucrative things, my trips ceased and I wised up. After all, many of these “nice places” didn’t hire blacks to work there.

    All of this bragging about…

    “My Lexus…”
    “My 600,000 home…”
    “My new boat…”
    “My Rolex watch…”

    …is just to show white people that we can be just like them.

    Whites could care less since they are the ones that allow us to have them in the first place. Self esteem runs low for us all around the world so we fill the void with material objects to make us feel good for 20 minutes.

    I have learned what impresses people the most is the fact that you are a self made man/ women, have a good, clean, decent life, well mannered children, a caring family and you have genuine self respect.

    Then they’ll drool with envy even though they’ll never say it.

    What black people need to do before they even begin to build ANYTHING is learn to love and respect themselves. I know how cliché that sounds but it’s true! We cannot have a community full of self hating, lazy, intra-competitive Negros who all want to be on top without working for it.

    Another reason why we fail is because we see million dollar basketball players flashing their money in our faces and we envy them. I’ve heard black mothers telling their sons not to go to trade school and focus on getting into the NBA.

    These people are setting up their children for extreme failure…and depression. Is it no wonder why they later turn to gangs and crime?

    I’ll get off my soap box now…

    • Trojan Pam says:

      @ diaryofanegress

      I got a kick out of the picture you painted:

      My guilty pleasure, when I had money, was traveling.

      I’d spend money on beautiful bed and breakfasts in the countryside of Maine, Utah, Oregon and Napa Valley, CA. Wine tasting, wheels of cheese and homemade jam was my thing. I didn’t blink to drop 90.00 on a good bottle of Red with lamb and brown rice.
      Once I rented a tiny cabin in Vermont and got trapped in a terrible blizzard. It was magical to spend 3 days in front of a roaring fire with no distractions and good hot chocolate.

      It almost made me forget the point I was making. 🙂

      Honestly, I’ve always admired your quest for self-sufficiency, to growing your own food, making your own soap and sewing your own clothes. If only we had a thousand like you!

      In any case, I must agree that whites aren’t impressed by our antics. They KNOW WE DON’T MAKE ANYTHING

      OR REALLY OWN ANYTHING that they can’t take from us.

      So, we need to drop that fantasy.

      I also agree with what you said 1000 percent:

      “What black people need to do before they even begin to build ANYTHING is learn to love and respect themselves. I know how cliché that sounds but it’s true! We cannot have a community full of self hating, lazy, intra-competitive Negros who all want to be on top without working for it.”

      Thanks for adding another dimension to my post — and thanks to all who posted!

  5. Victor Palmer says:

    “Why don’t do called Black neighbourhoods consist of Black owned businesses”

    “why don’t black people have Black businesses in their communities, but foreigners do?

    There is no such thing as a black neighbourhoods or black communities, because we don’t own anything. We are only made to believe we own things, but we are only allowed to own what we are given. We don’t understand that we are prisoners of war and still slaves.

    We were raised by the white People who practice racism , breed like livestock to be a slave workforce, sex slaves, and six centuries later.

    We have been miseducated to believe we are only supposed to be consumers, and not producers, but nothing really has changed.

    The global system of white supremacy has been refined to create the illusions that we as black people are free be who we want to be, but that is not the reality.

    We are still the builders of economies for the global business system of white supremacy and the support of the white nation.

    Basically, we have a parasitic relationship with white People who practice racism . We as black people are trained to be victims, and the white people are trained to be racists.

    We as black people don’t own anything that the racists can’t take or give to us.

    We can change our deprived condition by admitting to our true reality of our lives as black people on this planet, but we need to stop lying to ourselves.

    We need to engage in the practice of deep self-respect, and to learn what self-respect is.

    We need to replace racism with justice.

    Removing the global system of white supremacy racism is the only solution.

    All other solutions don’t address the problem of white supremacy racism.

    The problem of white supremacy racism has always been the true issue, but because we are miseducated and confused people we are easily sidetracked and deceived.

    We as black people don’t see the connection between thinking with true clarity and focus, or being confused of not knowing who we are as a people, and where we need to go for our future as a people.

    We only live for one day at a time with no plans of how to get there or even to know the importance for plans.

    • Trojan Pam says:

      @ Victor Palmer

      the issues you mention have been addressed in this post and other posts many, many, many times.

      1. educating ourselves about the system of racism/white supremacy
      2. admitting our poor position in a white supremacy system
      3. increasing the level of self-respect by examining our own behavior so we can better use what limited resources we have
      4. changing our behavior — what we think, say, and DO

      I understand what you’re saying, but, we STILL have to work, eat, live, like, love, have a roof over our heads, heat in the winter, water, electricity, etc.

      We can’t say, just because there’s a system, that our lives can be put on pause until that system is eliminated.

      Human beings — regardless of their oppression — will find a way to assert their humanity, regardless of how dysfunctional that “expression” might be

      The real question (for me) is how to exist WHILE at the same time eradicating the planet of racism/white supremacy?

      It is easy to say “remove the system of white supremacy” but NO ONE has that one solution.

      NO ONE.

      Otherwise, the problem would have been solved.

      what I’ve tried to do on this blog is to encourage myself and others to do the four things I listed.

      what I have NO interest in, is repeating the same mantra over and over again while offering NO real concrete suggestions.

      We need more ACTION, and less TALK, on the part of those people who believe or claim to understand the problem.

      Not just people talking about it.

      • Miss Pam

        I have concrete ideas.

        In Philly, the Hispanics banded together, 50 of them to be exact, and opened a tiny flea market. I don’t know for sure how much they paid for the land/lot space but I bet it was expensive. They worked together mowing the grass, cleaning up the broken bottles and cigarette butts and decided where cars would be parked and how many vendors they could have.

        They had their own family members and friends to help them make flyers and banners to announce the grand opening and had a real DJ…a Hispanic one, of course. Food, food and more food followed. They were a hit! Whites were there to get some good spicy grilled food and of course blacks were there pandering to them.

        The same formula can be found in the Puerto Ricans who have their own TaxiCab service. And the Dominicans who opened a (tiny) spice shop and the Mexicans who own a small laundrymat that can only fit 10 machines.

        Who are their customers?

        Other Hispanic people.

        And blacks who complain that “those folks are taking over my neighbourhood.”

        I’m sorry, Miss Pam, but I’m effing tired of hearing the complaints of blacks who REFUSE to work together as a UNIFIED group. I don’t hate or envy hispanics. They are doing exactly what THEY ARE SUPPOSED TO DO. My friend told me that the Chinese who are taking over black neighbourhoods in Philly come to the realty table as A GROUP and buy houses in CASH.

        CASH.

        NO bank is gonna say “ummm….no. Sorry. I really don’t want your 60,000 dollars in CASH.”

        EVERYONE knows this.

        It’s only us that finances (begs) our purchases and get shocked when racism is used against us.

        You know what black people’s problem really is?

        We’re not afraid of failure. We’re real good at failing.

        We’re terrified of SUCCESS.

        ‘Cause now there’s no more white boogeyman to blame. It’s all on us.

        Remember when I wanted to open up a group-owned black farmer’s market? All those “conscious” blacks ran away when they learned I had 5,000 in cold hard cash ready and waiting to see that lawyer so he could draw up the contract. When they thought I was just talking out of my arsehole, they agreed with me. When stuff became real, they ran like the wind. Now when this one woman sees me and begins to complain about “those folks taking over”, I just give her a blank look.

        Sorry but eff ’em.

        I’m busy working on the next step in my career.

        • Epiphaney says:

          @diaryofaNegress:

          Applause! Applause! Bravo! Bravo! Well stated! I could go on!

          You hit the nail on the head! Especially, “We cannot have a community full of self hating, lazy, intra-competitive Negros who all want to be on top without working for it.” I have witnessed a LOT of this type of knee-gro that you describe. And it factors into every age group. I am well aware that as black people, that we fight racism 24/7. However, it does not excuse the fact that when you KNOW what you are dealing with, YOU do what you need to do to SURVIVE. It has been said to me many times that “if you can get any TWO blacks to agree on anything, then you have something going.” Which leads me to agree with your statement that other ethnic groups do work together, support one another as well as work together. Yet, as black people, there is little to no trust among our core racial group and many blacks think that ethnic groups are looking out for our best interests? “I don’t think so.”

          Moving on, what is especially frustrating to me are three variables: empty arrogance and attitude, empty ego and MOUTH. And if your moral fiber is questionable and you do not manufacture or own anything, what, exactly, is that façade of bravado doing for you? Most often now, all I can do is shake my head and (as another comrade shared with me) “reach those who I am supposed to reach.” Bur the thing of it is that what some of us are doing ARE affecting the “ones behind us.” These kids, for the most part, are not learning group economics, principles of marketing or even cohesiveness.

          And if MORE of us really did care? This would be more evident. But our priorities, for the last 60 years, have been in the wrong areas. And we know what they are and I will leave it at that. When other ethnic groups gather together at the “economic table,” the black man is not invited. Why? Because he has already shown that he is not “hungry.”

          I will close by stating to EVERY BLACK FEMALE AND MALE: “When you KNOW better? You DO better. And if you don’t know?

          “You better ask somebody.”

          I’m out.

          Phazex_Female

        • Trojan Pam says:

          @ diaryofanegress

          Thanks for another eye-opening post.
          Blacks in america who descended from slavery have been greatly damaged by the system of racism/white supremacy
          in ways that no other people on this planet have experienced,
          hence their ability to come together based on a homeland, a shared language, culture, religion, etc

          while we were stripped of everything that made us a PEOPLE — and were given or forced to adopt an alien culture that despised us and our beautiful God-given melanated bodies

          and we have so internalized that contempt that we view ourselves and each other with contempt
          and for those who doubt it
          what other people refer to themselves in such derogatory terms, such as

          “Your black ugly self.”
          “I can’t stand niggers.”
          “With your nappy-headed self.”

          Let’s not forget the gangsta rap that degrades black females and cheapens black life
          Even our comedy (?) degrades us as black people where we ridicule our bodies and culture in ways NO OTHER GROUP has done
          And our youth (and some not so young) lap up this self and group degradation like the nectar of the Gods
          (not their fault, it’s all by design)
          But who will change this dynamic?
          The same people who created it?
          Or will we muster the courage and the will to fight back?
          Bottom line, until we turn off our mental shackles of self-hatred and group-hatred,
          there will be no progress
          And that fact has become crystal clear to me

          • @ Miss Pam

            I do understand your (our) American plight. Islanders had it rough too with the sugar cane plantations. Until today, Rum and Molasses are our biggest producers. We were also raped and beaten and stripped of our native language even though we speak African Creole (patios).

            What I’ve come to understand about our people is this misguided thinking:

            Every race of people understands that they cannot BEAT this white man. He has all the weapons and all the power to take us out. He reminds us of this all the time. Especially now with Trump in office.

            Fine.

            Instead of trying to be apart of his kingdom, and he’ll NEVER allow that to happen, they (other races) go out and TRY to obtain a kingdom of THEIR OWN.

            How do they do this?

            By learning the harsh game of united we stand, divided we fall. They go out and practice group economics even to the point of driving 20 minutes to wash their clothes in a laundrymat owned by someone who looks like them.

            By uplifting and supporting and PROTECTING the women of their race/ tribe and raising better sons/ daughters to continue their bloodline.

            Not one group can function under this racist system and be respected in their community when:

            1. Your women are being called dirty names.
            2. Your children have no fathers.
            3. You are selling drugs to YOUR OWN KIND.
            4. You kill each other.
            5. You are a pedophile that preys on your own children.
            6. You have a dirty home.
            7. You carry yourself dirty.
            8. You publicly degrade your own people for money.
            9. You hate your reflection.
            10. You leave and abandon your community for the women of your historical enemy.

            Why has black America failed?

            We failed because we continue to subscribe and pander to a Eurocentric, patriarchal, anti- black female society.

            Yes…I know all about slavery. I’m Nigerian descent. I know what happened to me. I never use to as an excuse not to TRY.

            When I do fail, and I have, I pick myself up and try again. Last year, a racist white man told me I wasn’t welcomed at his farmer’s market. I cried for 10 minutes, sulked in my truck…my bottom lip sticking out about 2 feet long, said a few choice phrases, then moved the fuck on.

            I realized my insanity trying to survive in corporate America with people, and I use that term loosely, who set me up for constant failure. So I left and made my own way. Do I struggle? Yes. I stilled haven’t filled up my kerosene tanks yet. I need more firewood. And my car needs gas.
            But I trying…

            White people are doing their part as evil on this planet. When they come after us, It should be no shock by now. They are DESIGNED to hate and stomp on us. They are doing what they came here to do.

            Why aren’t we doing our part?

            This is why I say, much to the ire of many blacks to have unsubscribed from me and stopped talking to me, we share 50% of the blame.

            The issue, the real issue, is black people simply have given up.

  6. Timothy says:

    @Sister Trojan Pam

    Very Excellent, Profound post.

    The situation where were are at is based on many reasons. Many black people have low self-esteem and view total white self reliance as a solution, which in reality has harmed our community. Many black people are afraid of taking massive risks in developing liberation. Other black people want to preserve the status quo, which is a disgraceful mindset. A solution will be multiple actions not just one thing. There has to be psychological development in our people in seeing Blackness as Beautiful. Also, we have to understand the real definition of true wealth. As you have stated, wealth is not about fancy cars, shirts, and things that don’t matter. Real wealth is about land (as Malcolm X taught us), art, music, museums, healthy foods, various institutions, housing, parks, and other valuable resources that can be passed down through generations. I don’t agree with Booker T. Washington in his Atlanta Compromise speech, but he was right in advocating trade schools and vocational education. The reason is that a strong civilization is defined by the quality of resources that you can build. That is why we need more electricians, more architects, more STEM field experts, etc. in our communities since see have more than enough athletes and musicians. We need more building and economic development. Black youth definitely should be taught about economics, STEM fields, Black Love, etc. since STEM fields are here to stay.

    Brutal honesty is needed too as many of our people must realize how urgent the situation is. We have record income inequality, wealth issues, and the exploitation of our people economically by non-blacks (many of them overtly say racial slurs against black people). There is no excuse to be naive about this situation when many of our people are being murdered by white racists. Black economic development is a necessity. Also, we have to inspire black entrepreneurs to make great business plans, to create great quality products, and to advance Pan-African unity. In other words, there is no shame in us (who are black Americans) in asking advice and getting resources from Africans and other black people from the African Diaspora in creating enterprises in America.

    Trade is key. I reject xenophobia. Also, we need to learn from the mistakes of others and have time for self-reflection. A solution will never exist without self-reflection and understanding the problems of the past. I believe in democratic rights and improving the environment, but there can be no true freedom without economic independence. Too many of our people only wanted to fight for civil rights alone without fighting for economic autonomy also. I believe in black independence where we live our lives as independent human beings and live in our own infrastructure. We have to do our part and advance more unity (as other ethnic groups have done for a long time). We have to promote morality and integrity as revolutionary power must be bounded under integrity.

    Thank you for the information Sister.

  7. Great post Pam! And thanks for the video. Anderson brought up some excellent pints that are hard to argue against. I will have to share this.

  8. Trojan Pam says:

    @ Kushite Prince

    Thanks for sharing

  9. Shanequa says:

    This was a very informative video. Thank you Trojan Pam!

  10. Epiphaney says:

    Addendum: The following is an interesting article that I read recently. In fact, it is located just under the link about “racism is white supremacy.”

    I clicked on this link, however I was unable to open up. So I had to do a “cut and paste” to share it with all of you. The article states that are 10 things that one should know about racism. Read on…

    Things Everyone Should Know About White Supremacy

    In the age o fpost Obama, the phrase “white supremacy” is used in political discussions like an imprecise shotgun blast.

    By Chauncey DeVega / AlterNet

    The use of the phrase “white supremacy” is ubiquitous in American political discourse. This is a result of many factors. Primarily, the election of Barack Obama and the United States’ changing racial demographics have created a reactionary backlash from white conservatives.

    White supremacy is referenced in relation to specific news events as well. For example, the murder rampage by the neo-Nazi Frazier Glenn Miller, the recent weeks-long debate between pundits Ta-Nehisi Coates and Jonathan Chait about “black pathology”; birtherism; stand-your-ground laws; and the open embrace of the symbols and rhetoric of the old slave-holding Confederacy by the Republican Party have been framed and discussed in terms of white supremacy.

    Conservatives and progressive often use the phrase “white supremacy” in divergent ways. Conservatives use the phrase in the service of a dishonest “colorblind” agenda, evoking extreme images of KKK members and Nazis as the exclusive and only examples of white racism in American life and politics. Conservatives use extreme caricatures of white supremacy in order to deflect and protect themselves from charges that the contemporary Republican Party is a white identity organization fueled by white racial resentment.

    Liberals, progressives and anti-racists use the phrase “white supremacy” to describe the overt and subtle racist practices of movement conservatism in the post-Civil Rights era, and how American society is still structured around maintaining and protecting white privilege.

    This analysis is largely correct: however, it often conflates concepts such as racism, white privilege, and white supremacy with one another. Language does political work.

    In the age of Obama, the phrase “white supremacy” is often used in political discussions like an imprecise shotgun blast or a blockbuster bomb. If the Common Good and American democracy are to be protected—countering how the right wing has used the politics of white racial resentment, racial manipulation, and hate to mobilize its voters in support of a plutocratic agenda—a more precise weapon is needed. A necessary first step in that direction requires the development of a more detailed and transparent exploration of the concept known as “white supremacy.”

    What is white supremacy?

    1. White supremacy is a complex social phenomenon. It is also a relatively new invention that was created to make Europe’s efforts to colonize and conquer the world seem like a “natural” process wherein “superior” white races would dominate “inferior” non-whites.

    The Transatlantic slave trade was pivotal for the invention of race by creating a sense of group stigma and a belief in the concrete biological differences between white Europeans and Africans.

    In the United States, a white supremacist racial order was birthed by a revolt in 17th-century Virginia, when black and white indentured servants allied together to fight for their freedom and rights. White elites defeated their rebellion and instituted a system of racial classification in which white indentured servants would be given land and guns after their service was complete while blacks would be made into a permanent class of slaves.

    2. White supremacy is comprised of habits, actions and beliefs. It is not necessarily reliant on the specific intentions of its actors, practitioners or beneficiaries. Of course, there are “active” racists whose intentions, words, and deeds are meant to advance a racist agenda. However, implicit and subconscious bias, as well as taken for granted stereotypes and “common sense,” can also serve a white supremacist order. Ultimately, intent is secondary to the unequal outcomes across the colorline that individuals benefit from and perpetuate.

    White supremacy also has the power to reorient and reimagine empirical reality for those who have consciously and/or subconsciously internalized and learned its principals and assumptions. White privilege is central here: those people considered “white” are also judged to be “normal”; the experiences of white people are taken to be universal and a baseline for how others are to be evaluated; African-Americans are judged en masse as having “bad culture” while whites are de facto viewed as having “good culture.”

    White people are viewed as individuals where the bad behavior of one white person does not reflect at all on the merits of the group. By comparison, African Americans and other people of color are not afforded that freedom. Ultimately, for white supremacy one’s “Americanness” is naturally linked to one’s whiteness, while the loyalty, and sense of civic belonging assigned to people of color, is contingent until proven otherwise.

    3. Images of terrorist organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis serve as outlier caricatures of racism in the post-Civil Rights era. These cartoon versions of white racism do the work of white supremacy as a social and political force because they present virulent white racism as an anachronism or the habit of somehow damaged and defective white people who should be ejected from the public square. In colorblind America, “polite” and “respectable” white supremacy is far more dangerous to the life chances and safety of people of color than the overt racism of the Ku Klux Klan or other racially chauvinistic organizations.

    4. In the most basic sense, white supremacy is a philosophical, material, ethical, economic, scientific, religious, and political system that works to maintain the dominant and relative superior group position of those identified as “white” (and their allies) over those marked as “non-white.”

    Thus, white supremacy is the philosophical and systemic umbrella for white racism.

    5. Racism and prejudice are not the same things. Racism is prejudice plus power. Racism is also the ability of one group of people to systematically impact the life chances and freedom of others who are deemed to be the Other.

    Although it is convenient and easy to believe that all groups in the United States are equally “racist,” such a claim is empirically unfounded. Moreover, such a fiction sustains white supremacy by ignoring the vast amounts of historical and contemporary evidence detailing how American society is politically, economically, and socially structured to the advantage of white people.

    In the United States, white people are the dominant racial group. Of course, there are white individuals who commit active and intentionally racist acts. But, the most powerful manifestation of white supremacy as a type of group power is how individual white people in American society can still passively benefit from white racism and the psychological, material and political advantages it brings to their group.

    6. White supremacy is an evolving political project. While America’s laws and practices along the colorline have certainly changed, the relative superior group position of whites over non-whites remains a relative constant.

    This is one of the primary fruits of the white supremacist project.

    7. White supremacy works on an institutional and inter-personal level. Its ultimate goal is securing more resources, power, opportunities, and privileges—material, psychological or otherwise—for the in-group over the out-group.

    8. White supremacy is a racial ideology that works to maintain class inequality. White people as a group receive a disproportionate amount of public aid and support. However, conservatives can focus on the black and brown poor, using stereotyped images such as the “welfare queen” or “illegal immigrants,” to both legitimate cutting the social safety net and advance an agenda which hurts the working and middle class. Here, white supremacy can be used to manipulate white people such that they act against their own material self-interests.

    The racial logic and commonsense of white supremacy (and a white racist society) is sustained by not asking about first principles.

    For example, what public policy decisions led to white Americans having at least 20 times the wealth of black Americans? Why are urban black and brown communities economically disadvantaged, and white communities (i.e. the suburbs), have been materially advantaged by comparison? Whose interests are served by a criminal justice system that disproportionately and unfairly punishes people of color?

    9. Colorblind racism is the most recent iteration in a white supremacist order where it is possible to have “racism without racists,” and a black American president, while social and institutional systems still privilege whites over African Americans and other people of color.

    White racial innocence, and a sincere belief by many white folks that they do not hold racist attitudes, or benefit personally or collectively from systemic white racism, is an example of how white supremacy has evolved to make itself relatively invisible (to willfully ignorant white people) as a dominant social force in American life.

    Consequently, one of the deep tensions and challenges surrounding racial discourse in post-Civil Rights America is how to locate a given white person’s relationship to a broader system of institutional racism.

    10. Austerity, neoliberalism, globalization, and the culture of cruelty are some of the most powerful social forces in post-Civil Rights America. White supremacy does not exist separate or apart from those ideologies and practices.

    The destruction of the social safety net and the siphoning of resources from the middle and working classes to the very rich are legitimated through a language which focuses on punishing the “lazy” and “unproductive” poor, i.e. people of color, in the service of “efficiency” and “fairness.”

    The gutting of the public sector, deindustrialization and the wholesale elimination of jobs which pay a living wage, has had a disproportionate impact on black and brown communities. In many ways, the onerous assault on the (white) American middle class by the forces of Austerity and “privatization” was tested and pioneered on inner-city, working-class, black and brown communities.

    The militarization of police departments, the excessive use of police force against innocent people, and the surveillance society was first applied to black and brown communities in America’s central cities. These policies met with little complaint from white people who felt that they were being “protected” from “black crime.” Those forces are now being unleashed on the white middle-class to their surprise and shock.

    White supremacy involves, both in the present and historically, the systematic transfer of wealth, income, and other resources from non-whites to whites as a general group, and a white elite, in particular. There are many examples of this phenomenon.

    White Americans have at least 20 times the wealth of blacks and Latinos. The Homestead Act, the New Deal and the GI Bill, were all examples of wealth creation opportunities and an inter-generational transfer of resources within the white community that African Americans and other people of color were specifically denied access to. The extreme levels of wealth and income inequality in the United States is a story of how race and class work together to structure life outcomes.

    His essays can also be found at Chaunceydevega.com. He also hosts a weekly podcast,

    Enjoy, for “reading IS fundamental”.

    Epiphany

    • Timothy says:

      @Epiphaney

      Thank you for showing the article. I have read it. One of the great points in it shows how the racist system judge white people as individuals, but black people are judged as in a collective, scapegoating fashion. One example is when a white person murders a person, that person is solely criticized. When a black person murders a person, evil people want to condemn the black community as a whole (which is evil and ludicrous). The article made great economic points about how for centuries, economic inequality and destructive policies have led many in the black community to suffer not only poverty, but extreme policy. Most black people in America are not on welfare, but one racist talking point is that most black Americans are on it (which is a lie). Pregnancy rates among the black youth are going down, black life expectancy rates are increasing since 2000, some cancer rates have declined in the black community, and total black crime rates in America have gone down since 1980, but these news are not known by many. Racism is not just about individual slurs. It is a systematic injustice that harms communities worldwide. It can be overt and subtle via microaggressions, etc. The author gives a powerful definition of what white supremacy is. Freedom is certainly about land and power.

  11. Epi says:

    Good Morning, Brother Timothy:

    “…Most black people in America are not on welfare, but one racist talking point is that most black Americans are on it (which is a lie). Pregnancy rates among the black youth are going down, black life expectancy rates are increasing since 2000, some cancer rates have declined in the black community, and total black crime rates in America have gone down since 1980, but these news are not known by many.”

    THE REASON WHY THIS FORM OF NEWS IS NOT KNOW BY MANY IS DUE TO THE MASS MEDIA HAVING ITS OWN BIASES. I BELIEVE THAT NEWS SUCH AS WHAT YOU DESCRIBED ABOVE IS NOT SOMETHING THAT THE MASS MEDIA “WANTS TO GET OUT THERE” OR WIDELY KNOWN. ANOTHER EXAMPLE WOULD BE, FOR EXAMPLE, “AMBER ALERTS” ON THE MANY, MANY BLACK CHILDREN THAT ARE MISSING. HOW MUCH MEDIA ATTENTION IS GIVEN TO THIS? AND THIS IS WHY OUR BLACK PEOPLE NEED OUR OWN NETWORKS, ETC. TO ENSURE THAT WE ARE NOT TREATED AS AN AFTER-THOUGHT IN ANY ARENA.

    Thank you, as usual you have provided keen insight!

    Epi

    • Timothy says:

      @Epi

      You’re Welcome. I agree with you that we need more of independent black media. We are best qualified to tell our own stories and insights as we are black people. Also, we should support black people, who are sincerely and massively showing the truth to the masses too. Respect and support go hand in hand. It is a disgrace that missing black children are omitted by the mainstream media too as you have stated. The lives of black children deserved to be saved too. I read about the many missing black girls from the DC area. Growing our networks is paramount as self-determination is always a legitimate goal to achieve in our community.

  12. Thanks for posting Pam, we are in a most pitiful state having to depend on our enemies for jobs. We are in a desperate need of attitude and behavioral changes within the black collective on planet earth. The sad part is most of our people are really confused and do not want to hear anything about racism white supremacy because Jesus will take care of everything anyway, hasn’t he always taken care of us? That’s what confused black people will tell you. Thanks for posting this critical information and I look forward to hearing you on the C.O.W.S next week!!

    • Trojan Pam says:

      @ blackempowerment1

      I agree. Just as an example, a (male) friend of mine just told me this morning that the woman he’s dating just purchased a pair of “Red Bottom” shoes for $750.

      Let’s call her Lady A:

      She goes shopping about 5 days a week, buying cheap stuff because she makes under $40,000 a year. She has no money saved and her credit is poor. She has no safety net and is living from paycheck to paycheck (like most people) and has a house full of stuff she’ll never use or wear. She’ll be 50 next year.

      Lady B

      Lady B drinks top shelf “Kettle One” vodka, only wants to eat at expensive restaurants, and buys expensive things but she’s up to her eyeballs in debt and has to work overtime every week to meet her financial obligations. Has no money saved, and has no man but is desperately looking for one to help finance her lifestyle (she admitted this to my friend). So far, no takers. She’s in her mid-50s.

      And they are not alone. I never heard of these shoes until he told me about them, all I know is black females are making some white person very rich buying $750 a crack shoes because they have “red bottoms” — and I doubt this “shoe designer” even wants us representing his brand.

      but he or she will take our cold hard cash.

      This is where far too many of our heads are at. CONSUMERS not PRODUCERS

      I get it. It’s what we have been taught. But at what point do we say ENOUGH. I’m not going for this BS that I’m nobody unless I have somebody’s (white) name on my feet, back or a**s?

      And when things go wrong for many black females? What do some say?

      Jesus will fix it

      Frankly, with all the wickedness in the world, I think Jesus has more important issues than dealing with this kind of foolhardiness.

      • Epiphaney says:

        @ Trojan Pam:

        “All I can do is to shake my head.” And there are thousands of sistas like the ones that you described above. Spirit, help us all.

        Epi

        • Trojan Pam says:

          @ Epiphaney

          The thing is, we’re competing with each other, black females in a race to the economic bottom via our purchasing decisions

          cars, clothes, shoes, purses, hair, nails, toes,

          with our eyes on what other black females have or don’t have — coupled with the fraudulent images on reality TV that show black people

          living large

          driving rented cars and living in rented homes that the TV networks are paying for

          Now, there are black people who can afford their lifestyles but too few of us invest in things that build real wealth: PROFITABLE BUSINESSES that pass from one generation to the next

          And that is what the white supremacists don’t want us to do–and will throw every roadblock in our path to prevent that from happening

          black people are the cash cows of this society

          even an immigrant just off the boat who doesn’t speak english can see that

          As the number of layoffs continue to rise and stores close and the wages get lower and lower and more immigrants pour into this country taking the jobs black people used to do

          I don’t see this ending well

          • Shanequa says:

            @Trojan Pam
            It’s becoming more harder for black people with or without degrees to find jobs. I live in Texas an alot of job positions are preferring bilinguals . I have heard some black people say when Obama leaves office it will be more job positions available for black people. Obama is out of office an black people still having a heard time finding a job.

            • Trojan Pam says:

              @ Shanequa

              I don’t get their logic. At first people said black people would do better under Obama and now some are saying we’ll do better after he leaves office?

              The mainstream media has lied about the economy, about the unemployment, about the reasons so many stores and businesses are closing, about the housing market (it’s way down in many areas with a ton of foreclosures out there) so things are not getting better for most people.

              In fact, the last eight years have wiped out much of the so-called gains black people allegedly made, yet some still tie their wagons to Obama’s “star.” That’s more logic I don’t get but whatever…

              Now, that Trump’s in office, people are still being lied to. I’m not saying he’s competent but the office of president is an EMPTY SUIT. Trump–good or bad–is finding out he has very little power and he will be blamed for what the people in power are doing.

              That’s why I caution people to STOP taking what the mainstream media says as truth. It is not. The Russians didn’t hack the elections. The voting machines aren’t even on the Internet. Russia is not our problem, the people who run this government–the hidden faces–are.

              Power does not change hands because the people walk into a voting booth and push a button. We all need to keep that in mind

              • Timothy says:

                @Sister Trojan Pam

                The anti-Russian paranoia is similar to a modern day McCarthyite scare.

  13. […] via Dr. Claud Anderson – ‘The State of Black America’ — Racism Is White Supremacy […]

  14. Courtney H. says:

    @ Everybody:

    I know that this article is not really related to this post, but I believe that it is very important to our community:

    https://www.theguardian.com/inequality/2017/jun/13/healthcare-gap-how-can-a-child-die-of-toothache-in-the-us

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      I will certainly read the story about healthcare Sister. Thank you for mentioning the important information.

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      I read the entire article. The article is very heartbreaking to see a complex bureaucracy treat a child and a family in a disrespectful fashion. Alyce Driver is a brave mother who did her best to try to save the life of her child. In many cases economic inequality and lax resources exist in many of our communities. This is why many of our people struggle for basic health care needs. Deamonte Driver was a victim of a broken health care system. He passed away in 2007, which was before the ACA was passed. Also, it is important to praise the dental mobile unit in the Maryland area that has help countless children. Poor black people have been slandered and disrespected not only by various corporations, but by reactionaries (who don’t care about caring for the poor and the neglected). The Deamonte Driver Dental Project, which is supported by Belinda Carver-Taylor, and other brave people, is making a real difference in the lives of people. Health care is a human right. Real revolutionary change does involve establishing concretely a stronger health care system for our community and compassion shown to the poorest of our people as well.

      Thank you Sister Courtney for showing the article.

      • Courtney H. says:

        @ Brother Timothy:

        Thank you so much for reading the (very long!) article and responding. I remember when this sad case happened years ago, and realizing that this is an example of how health care is really needed.

        The reason why people want to get rid of the ACA is because it was passed and legislated under the presidency of a Black man. Now a lot of people who didn’t like the ACA are now upset that they may lose it. This is another example of why health care is needed; people don’t realize that they need something until it is taken away.

        I also applaud the people involved in the Deomonte Driver Dental Project who are actually helping children who may have parents who work, but can’t afford basic health care. I hope (and am sure) that other medical personnel are doing the same things for other people who also need medical care that they can’t afford. Health care is a right, not a privilege.

        Again, thank you Brother for reading the article and commenting. It’s been been a while since I’ve heard from you ;).

        May you have a blessed week, Brother. 🙂

        • Timothy says:

          @Sister Courtney

          Well, it has been while, but I’m back. 🙂 I totally agree with you that health care is a human right. Many people have died for the sake of fighting for human health care. The Deomonte Driver Dental Project is doing amazing work to not only help children. They are saving lives and improving the quality of life for so many human beings. The story in the article was tragic in how red tape contributed to the death of one child. The mother of the child is doing inspirational work in making sure that young kids receive adequate dental care. The ACA was created in 2010 and the proposed Senate bill is a whole lot worse than the ACA. I have my disagreements with certain aspects of the ACA, but the GOP Senate health care is straight up cruel and horrendous.

          This issue is literally about life and death, because many people struggle to make payments on premiums. There are many big corporations who refuse to make affordable care available to people. You have many people with disabilities using civil disobedience because of the crisis that we face. In the final analysis, massive cuts to Medicaid and massive tax cuts to the wealthy (including taking health care from many seniors) as proposed in the Senate bill is literally abhorrent.

          Nationwide, there are unsung heroes who are taking their time in charities, free clinics, and other avenues to help the health care needs of many Americans. Those heroes should be honored, acknowledged, and respected.

          Have a Blessed Weekend too Sister Courtney. 🙂

          • Courtney H. says:

            @ Brother Timothy:

            Well, I’m back, too. 😉 Anyway with everything that you said in your response. There are a lot of people who agree that healthcare is a human right. It is that there are a lot of people out there who believe that they are entitled, and don’t want people who are not like them to have anything — which is pure selfishness.

            The people who are doing there part to help should be applauded. I appreciate people who are trying to do something about the healthcare crisis; they will be blessed.

            Thank you for your response to the article and my comments. May you have a blessed weekend, too, brother. 🙂

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