Guest Post – Education or Edited Dictation? by K. Kelile Ntwadumela

Posted: January 7, 2016 in Uncategorized

Education or Edited Dictation?
by Kelile Ntwadumela

(As seen in Journey 7 of Brother’s Perspective Magazine)

Pics
A paradox exists in education for all people of Afrikan descent, one that can be summed up with an old proverb.

The Story of the Lion cub and the Wild Boars

The story begins with a lion cub, lost and wandering, who suddenly finds himself surrounded by wild boars. The boars, natural prey of the lion, wondered what to do about the cub suddenly in their midst. They knew with him being a cub he would grow into a supreme hunter of their kind. The vegetarian boars couldn’t eat him as the lion would do to them. They thought about beating him up but quickly dashed the idea for fear of retaliation from the lions. Suddenly, the leader of the boars had an idea.

He said, “This cub is young and innocent. It knows nothing and is totally helpless. Let’s take him and raise him into thinking he is one of us.” The boars gave it some thought and agreed it was a good plan, so they did just that. The plan worked, so well that the cub grew into an adult lion who ate grass like the wild boars that raised him. He was the best warning system they had while grazing, acting as a sentinel, or look out. Any time he saw lions hunting he would scream, “Oh my brothers! Oh my sisters! The wicked, bad, evil killers are coming!!!”  Then he and the boars would run for cover as quickly as possible, saving them from being hunted down.

It worked like a charm. The boars would occasionally discuss the success of their plan, in secret. How easy it is to raise someone into believing they are you. The leader said, “What you do is you transfer your identity onto him, your concerns and your fears. He will feel your concerns and fears and he will protect you. This is what man did to dogs. They transferred their fears and concerns onto the dog. They turned dogs from their hunters and competitors to their companions and protectors, domesticating them. The importance of the dog in ancient human survival is evident by his title: man’s best friend.”

One day the pride of lions surprised the herd of wild boars. As everyone scattered, the kidnapped lion ran with the boars to safety. The hunting lions naturally assumed it was one their own, trying to catch a boar for the pride. As the boars reached the hiding place, they saw the lion they had raised, but they got scared and locked him out. In all the confusion, the boars didn’t know if he was a real lion or the one they subdued. The lion begged them to let him in. They took no chances.

Soon he found himself cornered. As the lions approached, he shook with unimaginable terror. He began to plead, “Oh! You bad, wicked, evil lions please don’t eat me!!!”  The other lions were shocked, asking, “Is he joking???” When the young lion began shivering in fear, they realized he was serious. The leader of the lions said,  “Look at us, and look at you. I’d say the only difference is in your mind.”

Looking at the sniveling boars, still quivering in their hole, the elder lion said with disgust,  “The boars, the ones you thought were your people. Didn’t they turn on you? Didn’t they lock you out?”

The story ends with the young lion pondering his predicament.

“The most obvious symptom is their absence of original thought. Ask them a question and they will end up reciting what someone else thinks or thought the answer was. What do they think? Well, they never thought about it. Their education consisted of learning how to use the library and cite sources.”- Charlie Reese

The human mind is born knowing nothing. Anything we know has been given to us by someone else. Children learn first by indiscriminate imitation, they copy what they see and hear. No one is born knowing who God is, we have religion because it is given to us by society and our families. This includes our perceptions of right and wrong or good and evil, our likes and dislikes and much more. All of these are learned behaviors.

The power that comes with racism is the power to include and exclude. The power to say you are in the club or are one of us or you are not. The dominant group, who have that power can dictate the very survival of the people that they deem as outsiders or different to the point of exclusion. The dominant group has the dominant truth even if their truth is a historical lie.

By virtue of the skin color of American Afrikans that made Europeans job that much easier. They used color to justify who was master and who was slave. Whose life is worth more or less? Who is human and who is 3/5ths of a human. Who is God’s Chosen and God’s cursed? Who is more intelligent? What racial group sets the beauty standard for our nation etc. Who is a citizen and who is a refugee?

We see these things manifest in the Katrina response by FEMA and the government, the Sean Bell shooting and the Amadou Diallo shooting (Both police shootings in which the police were not convicted for brutal killings of unarmed black males), proliferation of skin bleaching in black communities, the disproportionate A.I.D.S. rate among American Afrikans and much more.

The power of education is the power to include or exclude also. That power in essence lies with the ability to include or exclude the truth. Whether that is the truth about things one needs to know in order to survive all the way to the truth about the person who is learning. That kind of power in the end is the power of life or death for those who are the recipient of inferior education. The statistics speak for themselves.

Pics 2

“Why kill you when I can not educate you and get the same results?” – Author Unknown

The same way the media, politicians and economic experts are now speaking about the fact that the economic crisis we are experiencing is directly attributable to the past 8 years of Bush economic policy and an even longer corruption on Wall Street going back many decades. Our economical socio-political situation as American Afrikans is rooted in our past subjugation and this country’s collective and selective amnesia about American history, how history relates to our racial disharmony and how racism/white supremacy permeates our society on all levels. The racial situation has and continues to most acutely affect the former slaves of the American Government and white people.

Why is it that economists and politicians can see how the past affects the future when it comes to U.S. economics and a tight presidential campaign, yet they cannot see how history affects and influences the problems American Afrikans face every day and have faced since the first Afrikan captive landed on the shores of America? This is because they only use ‘truth’ to prove their point of view then ignore or invalidate ‘truth’ when it doesn’t coincide with their white supremacist agenda.

After Afrikans were effectively stripped of their, language, culture, spirituality, and autonomy, they were ripe to be psychologically rebuilt as the European and Arab world’s two legged beasts of burden. The same way the military verbally abuses a soldier for their first few weeks to strip them of their ego and self centered worldview then, they re-educate or domesticate him to be a part of a team and work for the greater ‘good’ of the military and the country they serve.

With ruthless efficiency the same was done to the Afrikan with more calculating, vicious, and genocidal intent. Their intent was to domesticate us so well that our mental enslavement and servitude to our former oppressors would no longer need to be overtly managed by them in a chattel slavery scenario, but it would self perpetuate if done right on a psycho-social level. Then they could subversively replace overt racism/white supremacy with a much harder to discern institutionalized racism rooted in the origins of this nations creation.

We were taught by our oppressor (racist/white supremacists) to be everything that they wanted us to be. Especially a detriment to our own people’s liberation by way of turning us against one another (anti-blackness), while making sure our allegiance was always to the all powerful “ God” ordained lords of the Earth, the European male (racist man, racist woman and racist child). That is what domination looks like in a system of white supremacy.

Education: What does it really mean?

In the Merriam Webster’s dictionary we find the following meaning for the word:

educate: educate

Main Entry: ed·u·cate Listen to the pronunciation of educate

Pronunciation: \ˈe-jə-ˌkāt\

Function: verb

Inflected Form(s): ed·u·cat·ed; ed·u·cat·ing

Etymology: Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth — more at educe

Date: 15th century

transitive verb1 a: to provide schooling for <chose to educate their children at home> b: to train by formal instruction and supervised practice especially in a skill, trade, or profession2 a: to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction

B: to provide with information : inform <educating themselves about changes in the industry>3: to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way <educate the public to support our position>intransitive verb: to educate a person or thing

The word educate or education is one of the most important words one can learn the meaning of if one wishes to truly understand how the world we live in functions and why certain groups of the hue-mans (white is not a color. The only race is the white race) are in the social, psychological, spiritual, economical and politically debilitated, handicapped, pacified and anesthetized situations we find ourselves in wherever we are found.

We (American Afrikans) who were the leaders of the struggle for oppressed hue-man liberation and the biggest culturally transformative force in the struggle for hue-man rights have now become complacent domesticated thinkers. Mass consumerism is our new paradigm as well as our psychological, educational and spiritual castration from our Afrikan cultural heritage.

The definition of education above has portions I highlighted that are important to study to and look into further to understand the full implications of the title of this paper. The first thing I find of importance is that it is root in the term educatus, latin for to rear as in raise. Take for example raising a child. It implies what we all know to be true. The first place a child learns is from its’ parents starting with the mother.

It also implies that there is a level of emotional involvement because one has to care about a child (a mother symbol) to raise or nurture and eventually teach a child. Our children go to under funded schools thinking that ill-equipped racist suspect teachers care for them and are teaching them the truth. As a result of this our children are then falsely lulled into accepting outright lies as fact because of the idea (natural assumption) that all teachers love what they do and who they teach.

In some cases it is true but in a lot of cases it is not. They have been taught the same lies they are teaching the children and they are ordained by the system to teach these lies by granting them a degree in institutions of so called higher learning. We can tell this is true by the fact that American children as well as adults are some of the most ignorant people in the world. Thus spawning a TV show that is a hit called “Are you Smarter than a Fifth Grader” Yet history shows our children have and continue to get inferior education leading to the large numbers of drop out/incarceration rates and the high and growing rates of gang affiliation.

Statistics on American K-12 Public Education

While most parents think their children are receiving a quality education, the majority of American students are falling behind their international counterparts. The consequences to the country are dramatic. – The Broad Residency.org

Definition 1a of education says: to train by formal instruction and supervised practice. This is pretty explicit. To be trained by formal instruction and supervised practice, means to do things they way that those in control of the day to day lives of the people of their country has taught one to do it. It doesn’t necessarily mean that what they’re teaching is relevant or accurate.

These white Americans (supremacists) are descendants of people that once believed and taught out right superstition in some cases with death as the option for those that oppose. They taught nonsense like the world was flat and that the Sun revolves around the Earth. When the fact that the Earth revolves around the Sun and the fact that the world is round is something Nile Valley Africans had known since well over 10,000 B.C.

The Nile Valley Stellar Calendar which dates to 10,000 B.C. as taught by Dr Yosef ben Jochannan and others and the Nabta Playa Astronomical observatory (the world’s oldest at that) located in Nubian Egypt which dates back to 9560 B. C. is proof of that. Yet these truths are not taught. Originally when their “facts” were taught to Africans it was done with a whip, a bible, a noose, gun and an overseer (If white people truly believe they are the most powerful, intelligent God ordained rulers of the Earth, why must they go through such extraordinary means to convince American Afrikans they are inferior?).

Now it is done with a pen and notebook, blackboard and television, radio, music, videos, motion pictures, mass media, video games, entertainment, the internet etc and the battle ground is as it always was the hue-man mind. They always understood that freedom is not a physical condition but a state of mind. Proper education fosters that paradigm shift as the Autobiography of Malcolm X is the best example of this transformative process.
This must not happen at all costs. A truly educated people wouldn’t stand or sit for what we have for the last 500 years.

What is Education used for by the wider society?

According to definition 2a to educate is: to develop mentally, morally, or aesthetically especially by instruction b: to provide with information : inform & definition # 3: to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way <educate the public to support our position>intransitive verb: to educate a person or thing

Education as outlined above is essentially the control of the flow and or integrity of information in order to affect a desired future result in those being educated. As we can see none of the parts of the definition stipulate that education is based on truth or integrity. It is just basic control of information. When the oppressed is being educated the question is what for?

American education as we know it in my opinion is really edited dictation. Since American education is largely based on memorization of concepts and ideas dictated to you by someone older, educated (also domesticated in their thinking) and qualified by the white people (white supremacists) in power who are the owners of the information and the dominant group to confer and pass on the information they themselves received and are just regurgitating to you.

They edit or doctor it in the way they see fit and tailor make it specifically in order to control anything from self perception to ones understanding the world and one’s place in it. Control of these aspects of perception makes for potent formula of mind control and behavioral soothsaying. This is why in America there are astronomical amounts of prisons being built instead of viable educational institutions.

They are preparing a place to make free use of the under educated, poor, politically unaware, socially and economically oppressed groups of this country which includes all of the nonwhite people within its borders. This is why the school drop out rate for people of Afrikan descent is so abysmal. The drop out rate directly coincides with the prison statistics. The drop out rate coincides with the lack truth and the lack of inclusion of the multicultural historical perspective that coincides with the multicultural reality America is as a nation.

Definition # 3 says: definition # 3: to persuade or condition to feel, believe, or act in a desired way <educate the public to support our position>intransitive verb: to educate a person or thing

If we now know that to educate someone is to persuade or condition them to feel or act in a certain way. Then this is the ultimate meaning behind this article. Those in control of the daily existence of American Afrikans know that an inadequate education is an almost guaranteed one way ticket to prison. This is the ultimate meaning behind providing an inferior education.

Education is essentially the control of the flow and integrity of information. By controlling the quality of the knowledge you put into a hue-man being you can generally predict his future behavior. If high quality information is placed in an individual then he or she will not allow themselves to be used by a system that was founded and still operates on racism/white supremacy and its byproducts; corruption, economic piracy and rogue capitalism they would seek to change it.

In order to keep things as they are, our education remains inferior. I want to ask; when did Nat Turner seek to change his circumstances? After reading the Bible and learning about how real Xtians are supposed to treat their fellow man. Realizing his captors were not practicing what their holy book or their God preached and he set to freeing himself by any means necessary. Freedom for him was a state of mind first. Then he sought to make it a physical condition.

They do not want us to formulate our own ideas about what freedom looks like, that way we will never be able act on it by changing how we deal racism/white supremacy (using effective counter racist practices.) They want us to continue to be ineffective at thwarting racism, so they can further refine their racist behaviour.

If low quality information or lies are put into an individual, first of all they will not think very far past basic survival. They will have no options in terms of making a legal living simply because no one will hire the ignorant or uneducated. For all of us, you have to be indoctrinated into the system in order get anywhere within it, even if it is founded on racism/white supremacy. This leaves them with few choices outside of crime as a means of survival, thus making their chances of going to jail almost 100%.

The other part of the definition also states to persuade someone to feel or act in a desired way. The question is for American Afrikans what are they trying to persuade you of?

They spent 300 plus years convincing us that God ordained them to kidnap, own, abuse, and kill us at will. They legally kept us uneducated, then told us we were stupid and contributed nothing to the advancement of hue-man civilization. They sought to erase us from history by making one of the world’s earliest civilizations Egypt a non Afrikan country with no connection to Black Afrikans.

All the while in 1822 Champollion and others were discovering the roots of hueman civilization as we know it in Egypt and Nubia, the Maangamizi (Middle Passage) was in full swing and they were kidnapping Afrikans in the western part of the continent as hue-man chattel to work on their plantations. They kidnapped us because they refused to labor to build their own newly stolen country for themselves, yet the eternal stereotype is that Blacks are lazy.

Something we say about each other constantly, following in their footsteps. Then when they finally allowed us to get an education it is of the most inferior quality. As they build astronomical amounts of prisons instead of better schools. Do they want to persuade us to be successful hue-man beings or are they herding us like cattle towards the free involuntary servitude of the Penal System?

Even the sentence in definition 3 it says: Educate the public to support our position. It doesn’t say whether their position is right or wrong. It is automatically assumed they are always on the right side of an issue as most of us do with the American government. That is how white supremacy works. White people are are always on the right side of an issue even when practicing racism.

It also assumes that the public cannot think for themselves so instead of giving them the facts so they can make an informed decision they seek to persuade the public to support their position. Just as the facts are there were no WMDs in Iraq but President Bush tried to “persuade” the public to support chasing Saddam instead of Bin Ladin. We have to truly understand how the meanings of words show the underlying intent behind the historical nullification of any real upward mobility for people of Afrikan descent. And the continued refinement of racism using words and ideas to confuse victims of racism.

Putting Our Unity in Perspective

We must realize it is in our collective coming together that we can analyze these issues and seek to find ways to collectively rise to the pinnacle of political, economic, spiritual and educational power and become more autonomous.

Ngugi wa Thiongo puts the motivation for our unity in perspective: “It is often asked, why study African Caribbean and African American literature? What is the connection between the African and the West Indian and the African American?

A) We have the same bio-geographic roots: the people of the West Indies and African America are Africans who, a few hundred years ago, were brutally uprooted from the African Continent.

B) We have shared the same past of humiliation and exploitation under slavery and colonialism. We have also shared the glorious past of the struggle the fight against the same force.

C) Equally important, we have the same aspirations for the total liberation of black people in the world.

We will do to remember Africans are a fundamentally communocentric people. Any deviation from this truth is anti-historical in that it completely defies how Africans built nations, civilization and cultures in the past and how they attained strength and respect through unity. As is displayed in the Setswana Proverb, “kgetsi ya tsie e kgonwa ke go tshwaraganelwa,” All Africans the globe over must be drawn to realize we are one people. Our motivation is interdependent and the spread of information is vital to our cause.

Using history to uncover our communocentric origins and utilizing an Afrikan cultural paradigm to restore a Pan Afrikan agenda is the only solution to our dilemma every where Afrikans are found. Every one from Marcus Garvey to Malcolm X all the way to Dr Chancellor Williams in his magnum opus: The Destruction of Black Civilization gives us an outline of the history of our unity as well as the factors that have lead to our
problems unifying today.

With the research he presented, he also outlines the importance of our unity to our future in the same book. Hopefully we can take heed to greatest of our leaders all of whom shared a common theme though they took different approaches to our issues as a race. They stated clearly that lack of knowledge of self and our lack of unity is at the core of our problems as a people. Stopping the practice of anti-blackness is the number one thing American Afrikans (ALL Afrikans) can do dismantle the system of racism/white supremacy.

White peoples success at dominating all non-white people is the infusion of cultural self-hatred in the groups they dominate. That self hatred for Afrikan people is the acute manifestation of anti-blackness in the form of disrespect of our elders, urban crime, murder, rape, black male verbal/physical abuse of black females, black female verbal/physical abuse of black males. Making disparaging statements about other black people in the presence of whites or directly saying these things to white people.

Snitching on one another for reasons of personal gain. If the people in power cannot depend on us to help them abuse us by our abuse of one another, if we see ALL white people as racist suspects (which they are at minimum) we could avoid a lot of the tragedies we experience at the hands of police, on the job and the average white citizen (Ie: George Zimmerman).

All of the answers to our problems can be arrived at by educating ourselves about the system of racism/white supremacy what it is and how is works and Afrikan history. The fact that white people make up less than 10% of the world population but they control 90% of its’ resources is proof enough. The only reason white people still run things is because the over 90% of the non white people subjugated by racism are actively and passively supporting their system of white supremacy. Whether it is anti-blackness or just by being consumers instead of manufacturers, we all contribute the most towards their success at abusing and subjugating us.

If we look back at the proverb of the lion and the wild boars. Let’s just call American Afrikans the lions and white people the wild boars. The wild boars (white people) trained the lion (black man) to loathe himself (become white identified) and he did their job for them (protect them from other lions. Oops I mean niggers).

But eventually he was treated like the enemy (a nigger) because he was never fully accepted he was always their enemy (a nigger). Only when he ceased to be of use to them because all lions (I mean, niggers) look alike did they show their true colors. Many of us (Black people) spend so much time looking for white validation, that when other blacks try to expose the truth of our brain washing (brain-trashing) and how that supports the system of white supremacy we are willing die or kill our own to defend white people.

“A people without knowledge of it’s past is like a tree without roots.” – Marcus Mosiah Garvey

Sources:

  • Merriam Webster’s Dictionary
  • Ancient Africa’s Black Kingdoms Website Article: How to Control People by Charlie Reese
  • A Chronology of the Bible by Dr Yosef Ben Jochannan
  • Story of the Lion and the Wild Boar African Proverb taught by Naba La Moussa Morodenibig R.I.P.
  • The Broad Residency: American Educational Statistics
  • Culture as a Weapon (The Liberator Magazine Vol. 8.1) by Gugulethu Neo Bodibe
  • The Destruction of Black Civilization by Dr Chancellor Williams

Suggested Reading:

  • Trojan Horse: Death of a Dark Nation by Anon
  • Racial Matters: The FBI’s Secret File on Black America, 1960-1972 by Keneth O’Reilly
  • The Isis Papers by Dr Frances Cress-Welsing
  • The United Compensatory Code/System/Concept by Neely Fuller Jr.
  • Yurugu and Let the Circle Be Unbroken by Dr Marimba Ani

Comments
  1. Which is why sending our children, and ourselves, to be educated by them is one of the worst forms of abuse we can do.

    We remain the ONLY group to do this consistently with NO other racial/ ethnic teachings and extra curricular activities on the side. The Jews teach their children from BIRTH about the alleged Holocaust.

    When we bring up slavery, we’re told to “get over it already!”

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      Thank you for showing the link. The powers that be don’t like anyone telling the truth to black people in the classroom. The teacher shouldn’t have been fired. It is very important to educate children on social justice issues. Central Park Five were innocent people who, after a long time, were finally out of prison. Thank you for the information Sister.

      • Courtney H. says:

        @ Brother Timothy:

        Thank you for reading the link. I agree with your statements. Here are two more articles about this teacher:

        http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/nyc-teacher-fired-lessons-central-park-article-1.2489687

        http://gawker.com/nyc-teacher-claims-she-was-fired-for-lesson-about-centr-1751791749

        • Timothy says:

          @Sister Courtney

          You’re Welcome Sister.

          I haven’t heard of this situation until today. The teacher is suing. We want students to have critical thinking and concrete analysis of social justice matters. In that sense, students can not only criticize evil, but promote good in the world. The Central Park Five is a story that is similar to so many other stories where innocent black men and innocent black women have been railroaded in the criminal injustice system. Many kids’ imaginations are captivated by stories of resiliency against oppression and about heroic black people. We want black students to receive the whole truth not Eurocentric whitewashes under the guise of “balance material.” This is why real education is critically important to advance in our communities. Both of us have educated children in real life, so we know how the educational system is. We believe in Black Love and Black Power forever.

          God Bless You.

          Enjoy the rest of your Day Sister. 🙂

    • K. Kelile Ntwadumela says:

      Thank you for posting this, Courtney. Anyone who was not born at the time of this case could not imagine how insane things were in NYC at that time. I was about 16 when this case took place. Black males were looked as two legged predators. And my Trinidadian Afrikan mother was constantly in fear for my safety. NYC had an almost 2k murder rate, the crack era was in full swing and their were numerous police killings of Black and other non white people. This story let one know just how little control Black people had over their lives. It informed how false accusations against American Afrikans was then and today still is a way of life for white “people”. It also proves how much work we have to do to solve the problem, racist man, racist woman and racist child – white people.

      It also makes me think of a case of international fame called the Trenton Six. Where 6 young black males including one that was handicapped were falsely accused of killing a white shop owner in Trenton NJ. My wife was related to 3 out of the six. Her father missed being arrested too solely because he chose not to hang out with his cousins that night or it would have been the Trenton Seven. Thurgood Marshall, Paul Robeson and Einstein among others supported them and help to get them exonerated. But their lives were never the same. It happened right after the Scotts Borough Boys case. You can read more about it here:

      http://www.capitalcentury.com/1948.html

      Thank you all for reading my essay. Your comments are insightful.

      Kelile

      • Courtney H. says:

        @ Kelile:

        Thank you for posting this other article, which is obviously more detailed than the shorter one that you linked.

        I was in college when the CP5 case happened. Like most people, I initially thought that the defendants were guilty, but the racist response of the case made me uneasy. Then when it was revealed that they didn’t do it, people still had the nerve to claim that the defendants were guilty, even they were exonerated because of DNA and the confession of the guy who actually did it! It just goes to show you that it is easier to believe a lie than it is to believe the truth, especially when the lie is told by white supremacists.

        Again, thank you for posting the links about the Trenton Six (and for letting us know about your personal relationship to three of the defendants!). They were very informative!

        • Kelile says:

          @ Sister Courtney. There were kind of accusations being hurled at these young men. On the cover of I think it was the NY Daily News they were called a wolf pack. Then they claimed the kids were talking about Tone Locs song Wild Thing when they were questioned what they were doing in the park that night. Back then we had a slang term we used to say when brothers would do dirt we called it “Wylin'”. White People eventually called it wilding once they realized it had nothing to do with a song. In which they were speaking of the numerous group of young people in the park that night robbing and assaulting people in the park. They did rough up a few people but they did not encounter or assault that white female.

          The guy who did the crime. A latino male was in jail for the murder of someone else when he confessed. Well after the falsely accused were in jail for years for a crime they didn’t commit.

          Not many know about the Trenton Six because it was such an international embarrassment NJ state suppressed the information.

          Thank you for you constructiveconversation and addition of the CP5. I have talked about that case for years and used it to inform young black males shat could possibly face in a system of racism/white supremacy.

          • Courtney H. says:

            @ Kelile:

            Thank you for your response. I remember the sensationalized coverage of that case very well. Donald Trump put out a full-page ad calling for the return of the death penalty to New York State, and after the CP5 were exonerated, he claimed that an NYPD detective told him they got a lot of money even though they were still guilty (despite the exoneration). Pat Buchanan came right out and said that the defendants should have been publicly hanged.

            This case is a perfect example of how Blacks and other POC get screwed over in the judicial system in this country. I’m glad you’re teaching this case, and I believe that teacher who was fired for teaching that class should be commended, not condemned. We need more teachers who are willing to teach real-life stories about society, and not just out of history books. We need more innovative teachers.

  2. Timothy says:

    This is a great article.

    Education doesn’t just deal with STEM fields, history, writing, and various languages. It also deals with the teaching of the truth history of black people to black children. It is about teaching black kids their intrinsic human value. Black children pick up so much so early and adults have the responsibility to build up children. Our people are masters of story telling, so it was great for the author of the article to use metaphors in order to make the point known (which is that black children in many cases are taught lies by mainstream schools, which is par of the sysem of racism/white supremacy. These anti-black lies expressed by propagandists have stunt the emotional development of many black children). It is time to teach black children that Black is Beautiful and real black history (which existed for thousands of years. We should never forget about the Maafa either). We have to raise up black children to know about their history, their culture, and their great human value. Education is the universal growth of consciousness. Qualified, excellent black teachers are more than qualified to educate black children. Education deals with economics, engineering, politics, culture, history, science, math, and other aspects of human civilization.

    Many African centered schools are in existence now and I support these schools.

    Therefore, the only people who can liberate us is us.

    • Courtney H. says:

      @ Brother Timothy:

      I agree.

      • Trojan Pam says:

        @ Courtney H

        Your comments are automatically moderated when they contain more than one link. There may be a setting I can change to increase the number of links allowed. In the meantime, I am not deliberately moderating your comments (unless I have a very good reason to do so)

        Just thought you should all know

      • Timothy says:

        @Sister Courtney

        Thank you Sister.

        • Courtney H. says:

          @Brother Timothy:

          You are welcome. I greatly appreciate your comments. You are telling the truth!

          You have a blessed weekrnd, too, Brother.

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            I appreciate your words too Sister Courtney. You’re Blessed like always. We believe in helping our people and standing up for what is right. We will keep on defending black African peoples and we respect the unity found in the black African Diaspora. The more that we learn, the more that we grow our consciousness. A the end of the day, we want our people to be liberated and live our their lives without oppression and injustice.

            @K. Kelile Ntwadumela

            I will certainly look at the information about the Trenton Seven. Thank you for your information.

    • Shanequa says:

      @ Timothy
      We really do need qualified excellent black teachers, because through the years I’ve been going to the public school system as a child I can’t think of one good black teacher that I had during my childhood. During my years going to public schools I had to find my own outside help or I had to learn it on my own while in school. We do need to teach our black children about their history to build their self esteem & image of themselves. You are so right stating, “education deals with economics, engineering, politics, culture, history, science, math, and other aspects of human civilization.”

      • Timothy says:

        @Shanequa

        You’re right Sister. We need more excellent black teachers. Many teachers who are black have been laid off, regardless if they were good or not. When I was in public school, I knew many great black teachers growing up from elementary school to high school. One great black Keyboarding teacher taught me how to type very fast. Teaching black children their self worth and their human dignity as black people. The children represent the future and the more we have to show them the truth. Education also deals with discernment, growing our own enterprises, and knowing about the schemes of the enemy, so we can develop strategies to combat them. Unity is important and a revolutionary mindset.

        • Courtney H. says:

          @ Sister Shanequa & Brother Timothy:

          I agree with your points. I have good Black teachers and bad Black teachers, as well as teachers of other races. We need more excellent Black teachers to teach our children pride and heritage, as well as “three r’s”.

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            I agree with you Sister.

          • Epi says:

            @ Courtney:

            You are correct in your assertion about the three “R’s.” It is difficult enough for our black people to have to deal with white supremacy and sell-outs daily, but in addition to that attempts to engage parent(s) in their childs(ren) educational process. I’m going to be blunt and I make no apology for it: though I do understand that the average parent is not a rocket Scientist, what I refuse to accept is a parent that shows no interest in a child’s scholastic activity, worse a parent that is LAZY. As parents, are we honestly being all that we can be in the education and development of our children? Could that possibly help to change things around for us?

            I wonder…

            Phazex_Female

            • Courtney H. says:

              + Epi:

              Thank you. As a substitute and a full-fledged teacher, I have dealt with quite a few parents who could care less about their children’S behavior and academic progress. Too many parents make excuses for their children’S bad behavior. A lot of parents have lost control of their children and then expect the teachers to raise them.

              My late parents were involved in education and always showed up for parent-teacher conferences. Too many parents nowadays can’t be bothered.

              • Epi says:

                I agree Courtney. I grew up in a two-parent household, and with the current climate I have “something to compare it to.” Parents should set the ground rules for the behaviors that they want to see in their child. The teacher should only reinforce what is being taught at home. Unfortunately, we are seeing less and less of this as the years go by.

                A teacher should only be that, a teacher or a substitute teacher. Not a parent. They know their role and a parent should know theirs.

                Thank you, Courtney.

    • K. Kelile Ntwadumela says:

      @ Timothy

      Brilliantly stated. I would add. The best way to teach children is to give them the truth of our incredible history. From all areas of the continent from the Monomotapa Empire now called South Afrika. The Luango empire, The Nok people, Dahomey, Songhay and Mali empires. Nile Valley Civilization to the Yoruba of Nigeria. Give all the history of our incredible achievements. Once they have been inculcated with that then we inform them how we got to where we are now.

      Show them how white “people” came out of Europe after the ice age with violence, disease, post traumatic cave syndrome & the global system of racism/white supremacy to dominate Black people and All non white people. We should breed a high level of suspicion on our children to innerstand that all white people are racist suspects at minimum and white supremacists at best, then provide the reason why using pre-antebellum , antebellum and post antebellum history. Teach them about the eradication of the Tasmanian people. Teach them the story of Triganini . Teach them about the maangamizi and the Arab Maafa. Teach them about life on the plantation. Read books like Kebuka by Mwalimu K. Baruti. The Destruction of Black Civilization by Chancellor Williams and all other books on our struggle against RWS. Then use contemporary history like Tamir Rice, the video of the white officer body slamming the Black female in her class room or the video of Oscar Grant. Etc. to show them how “modern” whites treat black children. inform then black children are not viewed as children and are treated like animals by the wider society, which why justify killing black children by exonerating killer cops. If we do this they will have a healthy distrust of all white people they encounter and they will overstand that self love and black self respect is the way fight the system RWS. Give them a Pan Afrikan foundation and cultural mindset to treat every black person they meet with respect and to respect themselves. They will then have a better chance of survival the racist gauntlet we call life in America. Also no television! That is the fastest way to start the process of losing one’s child to the system of white supremacy.

      • Timothy says:

        @ Kelile

        I agree with you that black youth should be educated on black civilizations from Songhai to the Monomotapa Empire. They should learn about real American history too (as our ancestors were the victims of the greatest injustices in human history. The slave trade happened in Africa, Europe, the Americas, and Asia). People have spent years and decades studying just one African civilization and we cherish our ancestors who sacrificed for us. Black children should be told about the leaders of these great black African civilizations and their accomplishments as you have mentioned. Children need to always be reminded that their Blackness is beautiful and that they can achieve massive accomplishments. If children are given great expectations, encouragement, and inspiration, then they can achieve mighty things.

        We have a serious problem of police terrorism in America. The police was founded in America as a way for them to control the populace of America and defend the interests of the one percent. That’s documented in how the police was used to harm the labor movement and harm black protesters during the civil rights movement too. The FBI and the local police collaborated to harm the Black Panther Party in Oakland, NYC (the Panther 21 were acquitted), and in other locations nationwide.

        Heroes like Brother Fred Hampton and Sister Olive Morris must be known to children as well. Kids should know this history. The police murder of black men, black women, and black children are injustices that have even going on for a long time. From Bloody Sunday to the murder of Tamir Rice, the police have members who don’t care about innocent black human life. The prosecutors, the grand juries, the police unions readily unite to prevent indictments of crooked cops. You have made a great point about Europeans. Modern Europeans have a disproportionate amount of Neanderthal DNA. Neanderthals aren’t modern human beings. After the Ice Age, ancient whites caused destruction and other evils from Central Asia to other places of the world. Chancellor Williams and other authors should be shown to kids. Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey, and other black leaders promoted a Pan-African mindset. We should show that mindset to children. That entails that black children need to know that black Americans, Africans, Afro-Caribbeans, Afro-Brazilians, etc. are one. Black children should be taught STEM fields from early on. Technology from digital technology to architecture must be shown to the youth as any infrastructure relies on STEM fields for its own development.

  3. Shanequa says:

    Today, the education of Black children is one of the most volatile issues in the United States
    politically, socially, and economically.

    • Courtney H. says:

      @ Sister Shanequa:

      You are correct.

      • Shanequa says:

        @ Courtney H
        Thank you sister. This fail education system is not built for our people to succeed. Furthermore, we have our people walking around with bachelors, masters , & doctorate degrees that can’t even build their own jobs or better yet find a job. Our people have spend centuries of assimilating to a system that is built for us too fail.

        • Courtney H. says:

          @ Sister Shanequa:

          You’re welcome, and I agree with your statement. The education system in this country is set up to fail us.

        • Epi says:

          Courtney:

          Let allow me to share this with you? I have found that time and time again, especially with our own black people, that MANY individuals hold “holier, better than, more educated than thou personas. I recall that when I was an undergrad, often after meeting others, blacks included, in business and social circles the reception that I often received was, “oh, how nice.” That is when I realized what my older sibs meant when they told me about the, “I’ve got mine, you get yours” mind-set. However, that did not discourage me. I kept it pushing and made note of pretentious and self-serving individuals. A lot of these very same people have done “naught” to help propel our race, aside from thinking that their view is the ONLY view and suffer from bad cases of classism, sexism, hell all of the “isms.” In short succumbed to EGO and ARROGANCE. Many place more value on that Amerikkan Government dollar than on their own black people. .

          Some of our people ARE about the business and others, well….as I’ve said before all of our people are not going to be saved. Out.

          Phazex_Female

          • Courtney H. says:

            @ Epi:

            Thank you for sharing that with me. I have to admit that I have been guilty of that mindset, too. I am working on that, though, because I know that deep down, a lot of people will not see my education, they’ll see a Black person to look down on. Many of us have had our “wake-up calls”. We have to work on keeping our arrogance and egos in check, especially when it comes to other Black people. Again, thank you for your response.

            • Timothy says:

              @Sister Courtney

              Excellent Points.

            • Epi says:

              You are very welcome Sister! You know, I have, for the most part, always been comftable in my own skin—no matter where I go or who I am surrounded with. This past MLK w/end, I was with a younger female relative out on the road and I decided to stop and purchase some fresh fish for me to grill at home. (these days I have moved away a bit from frying and my relative is a vegetarian, but will eat fish).

              When we got to the fish market, I began with my usual greeting, etc. and at this particular fish market (I was visiting in another locale), I noted that many of the people there were of Belizean descent. Not a problem, or so I thought. After I spoke to the employee and gave my order, we chatted a bit while my relative and I waited, I happened to look around, there was dead silence and everyone, including the cashier just stared at us. Why, I honestly do not know. So I continued my conversation, etc.

              I had a really interesting conversation with the employee and, after my order number was called, I went to the cashier to pay. The cashier’s attitude was very surly and her answers were clipped. Even my relative noticed it and later asked me, “what was that all about?” I told her that I honestly did not know and that Spirit told me that to even attempt to find out would be in vain.

              My point is that I was “tried and judged for something I don’t have a clue about. All I could do (as my relative often says) was “keep it pushing.” And I did. Yet, this is another scenario of how black people perceive AND treat one another.

              Sometimes, as much as one tries to have a “comfort zone” with another black person, “it just ain’t gonna happen.” Sad.

              On a happier note, I saw a film/documentary this past weekend called, “What happened, Miss Simone?” about the late Nina Simone. It is well known that Nina left the “United Snakes” (as she called it) and lived abroad for many years mostly due to racism. I am not much of a TV watcher, but this one was an eye-opener with quite a bit of history about the United States, the deep south and white supremacy. Bookmark this one and if you get a chance to view it? Do so. Nina wrote AND sang the song, “The King of Love is dead” about MLK.

              I honestly felt every bit of her pain and her pain when she performed on stage as well. .

              Phazex_Female

    • Epi says:

      I agree with this statement, moreover that unfortunately there are not enough conscious black parents that realize this and have the desire to change this. Like I said before, as a parent stop waiting for others or a leader to take you down paths less traveled. Common-sense when you or your off-spring is being misled or mistreated is when a parent should be vigilant and act.

      This society was never meant to accommodate you or your off-spring. There is no other way to state this.

      Phazex_Female

      • Timothy says:

        @Sister Phazex_Female

        I agree with you. Parents must be vigilant since children represent so much to us. A child is a signal on what our future will be as black people. We want them to know about the tactics of evil people and common sense advice including real solutions.

        • Courtney H. says:

          @ Everybody:

          What do you think of this?

          Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity.

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            Good Afternoon Sister Courtney.

            I will certainly make a commentary on the video soon.

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            I have listened to the video Sister.

            It is very disturbing that the video of Chapman’s death was released to the public so late after years. It is irresponsible for the video to be released by the authorities years later to the wider public. I’m not surprised that one investigator were told to change their findings if those findings contradict what the police desires to be told to the public. Chapman only had an I Phone and he was killed. There is no evidence that Cedric Chapman was armed with any weapons. I read that he ditched a stolen car and ran from two officers (according to the police’s account). If Chapman was involved in a stolen car, then he is wrong for that.

            We have an epidemic of police brutality. There is also an unjust criminal injustice system that caused black people to experience disproportionate sentences in prison as compared to whites (even if both were charged with the same crime). Chicago is in a state of crisis like many areas of America. We have massive poverty, unemployment, and other issues that must be addressed. Mayor Rahm Emanuel has done a terrible job in confronting police brutality, and he has closed dozens of schools in Chicago without just compensation. Rahm Emanuel is a puppet of the establishment and he should resign. Police terrorism existed for years and decades in Chicago. The story of Cedric Chapman’s death is a tragedy. If Dr. King and Malcolm X were alive today, they would be very much outraged at society today and they would be out expressing the need to fight back against tyranny in society. I believe in the value of work, integrity, and promoting stable families.

            Also, I can condemn theft and condemn the police using excessive force at the same time. It has been hard for us since the Maafa began.

            Yet, cops are killing black people irrespective of how we act and where we are from. So, I don’t agree with respectability politics. I will never respect crooked cops and black people should never be forced to respect any crooked cop. The real facts of the Chapman case should be known. I believe in promoting children enacting hard work. I can’t sympathize with the actions of a police terrorist. Also, Harvey is right that many young kids are selfish, but many young people do know what is going on. Not all 90s babies are lazy. So, not all young people are clueless of geopolitics or how the police operate. Not all poor black people are lusting after I Phones, etc. I don’t support imperialism. Just because people question foreign policy doesn’t mean that people want to stereotype or disrespect every military human being. People have the right to be anti-war if people want to.

            Therefore, I won’t support crooked cops. Victims of oppression shouldn’t be blamed for the actions of the oppressor. There should be a distinction made between promoting integrity in our communities (and believing in strong families and strong communities. No one should condone criminal activity that harms innocent human life and innocent property) and rejecting the impulse of some to blame black people for white oppression. So, my view of the video is that Harvey is right in promoting character in our communities. He’s right that young people need to promote stable structures. I disagree with him slightly on respectability politics as I reject respectability politics completely. I don’t agree with his usage of profanity. Many people are poor no fault of their own. Many upper class and middle class black people (not all) have neglected their responsibilities to help poor black people. To ignore the black suffering poor is not what Dr. King wanted. Dr. King and Malcolm X both condemned certain black people who wanted an individualist mentality and these folks reject helping black people in the ghetto (which is wrong). If Chapman stole a car, then he was wrong for that. The criminal justice system has always been corrupt for centuries, so that is a reality. Also, no matter the life of a innocent, black person, no black person should be murdered by the police unjustly at all.

            Thank you for showing the video.

            Enjoy you Weekend Sister. 🙂

            • Shanequa says:

              @ Timothy
              I would like to hear your opinion about BLACK COPS. I strongly feel these black cops need to be held accountable for not standing up when their own people are brutalize by the police. Too many black cops are silent but will speak when the same system they work for turn against them. I have seen several videos that went viral that showed black people protesting & calling out the black cops especially when they are at the scene for not standing up.

              • Timothy says:

                @Sister Shanequa

                Hello Sister.

                Here are my views on black cops. Many black cops refuse to expose police brutality and many are bounded under the Blue Wall of Silence. That’s a shame. The vast majority of black cops who criticize police misconduct that I have seen mostly are either retired (as they have more freedom to say what they want), are in various police reform groups, or are in a small numbers. Therefore, I agree with you that more black cops should voice their disapproval against police terrorism. Some black cops fear reprisal, loss of job, and demotion, but we speak the truth regardless of the threats of reprisals. If a black cop refuses to speak up for innocent victims of police misconduct, then that cop is just plain wrong. There are many incidents where some black cops refuse to stop police mistreatment of black people. Black cops who refuse to prevent police brutality against a black person has committed treason. So, there should be revolutionary changes in society. We want police terrorism and occupation of our communities to end. We want jobs with living wages and we want true justice in the world. We want an end to racial oppression and we want our black communities to grow and flourish.

                Thank you for your words Sister.

              • Shanequa says:

                @ Timothy
                Thank you brother.

              • Epi says:

                @ Brother Timothy:

                “Some black cops fear reprisal, loss of job, and demotion,…” This is horrific! SILENCE at the expense of black life, any life for that matter! Yet you are absolutely right. Many black law enforcement officers will ignore wrong-doing to their own people. Again, more focus on that “American government dollar” than the lives of their own people.

                You and other posters here have sounded the alarm….all that you can do is keep enlightening masses of our people. We are not only dealing with white supremacy, but at the same dealing with 500 plus years of SYSTEMS AND OPPRESSION. Under no circumstances do I wish to see this, but too many of our people are going to succumb to this.

                Spirit help us all…

                Phazex_Female

      • Timothy says:

        @Phazex_Female

        I agree with you Sister on your words on black officers and on police brutality in general.

        Have a Blessed Day.

  4. Kelile says:

    @ Timothy, you’re very welcome.

    @ Sister Courtney my wife’s relatives lives were never the same after that incident. They suffered from severe PTSD. A couple started drinking. They all were severely depressed and none of them ever reached their full potential, nor were even able to make strides that direction due to the system of rws. As a family we connsistently lift their sports up on our ancestral altar.

    • Courtney H. says:

      @ Kelile:

      I’m so sorry to hear that. Families are known to suffer because of injustice that have befallen relatives. I hope that somehow, your family will be able to recover from this travesty of justice and tragedy that has happened to your family.

      • Timothy says:

        @Siser Courtney

        That is very Sweet of you Sister for your great words to Kelile. Being compassion with each other as black people is always a blessing.

      • Kelile says:

        @ Sister Courtney. Thank you for your kind words. Throughout that incident, through study, I got to see just how much damage the system can do to Black families intergenerationally. How the psychological terrorism visited upon the Black family can have lasting effects on our ability or lack there of to properly respond to racism/white supremacy. Either these events bring the fighter out of you or one becomes defeated and catatonic in a perpetual state of PTSD. Black Self Respect is Black Mental Health. This is not designed to foster either of the two.

        Our ability to see one another as hueman beings is essential in this system. We have been psycho-socially conditioned to view each other as expendable subhuemans. Thus, our ability to be empathetic towards each other’s suffering is a first step toward establishing a paradigm shift towards American Afrikan and Pan Afrikan solidairity and collective upward mobility.

  5. Shanequa says:

    @ Everyone
    Read this article about this children’s book “HAPPY SLAVES BAKE GEORGE WASHINGTON’S CAKE!?” White people are sending out messages that they can’t wait to return to their “Gone With The Wind” glory days.
    https://atlantablackstar.com/2016/01/14/enslaved-africans-of-george-washington-depicted-as-happy-and-joyful-in-new-childrens-book/

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Shanequa

      The story is disturbing to put it lightly. This is why we advocate qualified, strong black teachers to teach black children about their real history. This children’s book not only glamorizes slavery, but it is filled with lies. Washington never respected black people as equal human beings. He either enslaved them or used our people for political reasons. No person can respect any human if that person is a slave owner. George Washington was a racist, a slave owner, and a hypocrite. He never emancipated slaves during his lifetime. He signed a reactionary Slave Fugitive Act that violated the human rights of black people. Scholastic, the author, and the illustrator should feel shame for doing this and supporting this. Right now, there is a growing outcry against the children’s book. Many black folks aren’t tolerating this. In Texas, many authorities are tying to sugarcoat the brutality of slavery too. Slavery involved rape, abuse, splitting up of families, torture, murder, and other evils that I can’t mentioned here. Children need to be told the truth that slavery was an international crime against humanity. The Maafa and slavery in the world will never be forgotten by us. Black children should never read that story. They should read real black history (like ancient African civilizations, Malcolm X, Harriet Tubman, Ella Baker, Miriam Makeba, etc.), sci fi, great fictional stories, STEM related books, etc. Thank you for showing this information.

      Have a Great Weekend Sister.

      @Sister Courtney

      I admire you. Things happen or a reason. I thank the Lord for communicating with you Friend. You certainly inspire me and you are a very intelligent, gracious, and strong black woman. Enjoy your Weekend including the holiday coming up on Monday. Bless you like always. 🙂

      • Courtney H. says:

        @ Brother Timothy:

        I agree with everything that you said about this atrocity of a book. I agree with Sister Shanequa that this book is disturbing.

        Thank you so for the gracious compliment! 🙂

        I enjoy your friendship, too, as well as the friendships with all my friends here.

        May you have a blessed MLK Holiday weekend!

    • Courtney H. says:

      @Sister Shanequa:

      All I can say is —

      WTF???

    • Kelile says:

      Greetings Sister Shanequa,

      My response to the article is a brief statement by Dr John Henrik Clarke made in the late 80s – early 90s. “The educational system is geared towards conditioning Afrikan people to accept their own reenslavement.” That article speaks volumes to the validity of that statement. There examples of this type of edited dictation across the country. Like Brother Timothy and reality_check said Black people ist teach Black children. And we must teach them the truth! It will save lives.

  6. reality_check says:

    Black people must educate black children!! I”m a firm believer in that. I”m sure you guys know this, but there is an effort to keep respectable black males AWAY from black schoolchildren, especially black males.

    True story: I volunteered once to tutor inner-city (read: black) schoolchildren. This was done through a nonprofit agency that promoted youth literacy. When I contacted the agency, they were super excited about my involvement. However, when I showed up for training and introduced myself and spoke to my credentials- things changed. Long story short, I never got placed in a school to volunteer- despite several calls and emails. The Executive Director would not return any of my emails or phone calls. One day I caught her in the office and she gave me some BS story about trying to place me. Mind you, this was an all white organization dispatching mostly white people to go into these schools to “help black school children to read.” This organization was begging for people to volunteer- they claim they couldn’t get enough volunteers. I was disappointed to say the least and initially couldn’t understand what happened.

    Fast forward a year later and I have started volunteering to assist elementary schoolchildren to read. I’m volunteering at an inner-city school that is 90% black students….but get this….the staff is 90% WHITE! It infuriates me that I, a black man, has to coordinate with mostly white females to volunteer to tutor black youth! This is disgusting and very dangerous for our youth.

    When I find myself getting upset I must remember that education starts at home with parents. I would never have my children educated by all whites- NEVER.

    Anyway, just thought I’d share my personal experience at how there is a concerted effort to keep positive black males away from black schoolchildren- especially when whites are making the decisions as to whom to hire/fire and choose for volunteering.

    Blacks have to reclaim our most precious resource- our children. If we don’t we have no future.

  7. Courtney H. says:

    Happy MLK Day!

    I know that I have posted these videos before, but I want to post them again, since this is MLK Day (these videos were made in relation to the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington).

    Each of theses three videos last about an hour long, and they contain a lot of profanity. Enjoy! 😀

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      Happy MLK Day to you Sister.

      Yes, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was much more radical than what some in the mainstream media has said about him. Back then, Dr. King was abhorred by mainstream society. They definitely didn’t like Malcolm X either. It is very sick of Ronald Reagan to disrespect Dr. King like that after he was assassinated. Dr. King said the accurate words about Ronald Reagan: “…When a Hollywood performer, lacking distinction even as an actor can become a leading war hawk candidate for the Presidency, only the irrationalities induced by a war psychosis can explain such a melancholy turn of events…” I agree with Dr. King. So, Harvey made many great, accurate points about this issue. Dr. King was hated by many in white society and by some black moderates (who didn’t want black people to be involved in the civil rights movement at all). Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wanted a radical redistribution of economic and political power.

  8. Shanequa says:

    I strongly feel Jada Pinkett Smith is only boycotting the Oscars because her husband didn’t get nominated especially with no black nominations.

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10153983404106320&id=51346591319&refid=17&_ft_=top_level_post_id.1102291543127867%3Atl_objid.1102291543127867

    Here is a article when Jada asking black women to allow white women to grace our covers.
    http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/2910224

    Will Smith made a comment he doesn’t see racism as a problem anymore.
    http://www.ok.co.uk/celebrity-news/will-smith-doesnt-see-racism-in-film

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Shanequa

      I head of this story recently too. Many black celebrities have came from poor environments and suffered a massive amount of indignities and racism. Jada Pinkett Smith is from Baltimore. Yet, when some get wealthy, many of them act brand new and talk in post racial terms. That is why we can never place celebrities up as infallible. Jada Pinkett Smith has spoken about the Oscars since Will Smith wasn’t nominated and she still wants acceptance from people who have no respect for her or for black people in general. Frankly, we don’t need the Oscars to validate ourselves as black people. We can honor our talented black people in many diverse ways. That is why many black people aren’t watching the Oscars. Hollywood since its inception has promoted racism, classism, xenophobia, sexism, and false, negative stereotypes. So, it is not surprising that the Oscars would behave in such a racist fashion. Jada is wrong in trying to force white women to grace covers that are geared to black women.

      Black women have every right to promote their humanity. We know that Black Women Rock. Also, black women readily are restricted in covering their images in magazines worldwide, so having black women oriented magazines with black women in the covers shows the importance of displaying positive black images. No one asks Hispanic covers or white ethnic groups with their covers to cater to black people in a mass scale (constantly). To promote black images in magazines geared to black people is never racist. It is about displaying the multi-dimensional humanity of black people. Therefore, black women have every justification to promote their beauty and their strength. Will Smith is definitely incorrect to say that racism isn’t a problem anymore. Racism is overt and covert in the world society. The Sony emails and the events in Charleston, South Carolina, etc. readily shows the viciousness of racism. We will fight. We fight by treating each other right, opposing white racism, and building up our own black institutions. To win, we have to build literally and protect our infrastructure.

      Thank you for showing the links Sister.

      • Shanequa says:

        @ Timothy
        Thank you brother I agreed with everything you stated.

        • Courtney H. says:

          @ Brother Timothy & Sister Shanequa:

          I agree with what both of you said. Here is a video calling out Jada Pinkett Smith:

          Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity.

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            Good Evening Sister 🙂

            I will make a commentary about the video soon.

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            I have listened to the video.

            He or Harvey made many great points about Hollywood. It is hypocritical for Will and Jada to talk post racial words, but Jada talked about boycotting the Oscars (when she talked about black magazines should be forced to have white images on them, etc.). Hollywood has consistently shown no respect for black people. Hollywood doesn’t respect Jada, Will, or any black person. Jada on A Different World was excellent. I love that show Now, she wants to compromise on some issues. I won’t talk about Jada and Will’s children since I won’t go there (and I don’t believe in talking about a family’s kids in that way). A lot of black people won’t watch the Oscars at all. The Oscars reward black people who either are in degrading role, the Oscars have no other choice but to reward black excellence, or if black people are in other “acceptable” roles. Will Smith is wrong to say that racism is not a serious problem in our society. That is why no celebrity should be placed as infallible. I don’t agree with with Harvey’s profane language, but he’s right that black people have been exploited by the industry for so long. An award is never superior to our dignity as black people. Charlie Sheen is a known racist and hypocrite. Hollywood is not progressive at all.

            We should never seek acceptance from our oppressors. We need to build in our own communities. Many of these black celebrities have mote than enough money to come together to establish more of their own distribution companies, shows, networks, theaters, and plays throughout the black African Diaspora. There are more important issues to deal with than the Oscars (like police brutality, imperialism, our communities, health issues, education, etc.). Harvey was honest and he’s right that some celebrities want to talk slick against black people, but when something happens to them, then they want some change. We want real change involving self determination. We reject tokenism. We want black liberation.

            Thank you for showing the video Sister. Bless You. 🙂

          • Shanequa says:

            @ Courtney H & Timothy
            Thanks for the message. Time & time again the European Hollywood constantly tell our people we don’t accept you. Our people need to realize boycotting will not hurt them period because they already know our routine. We need to stop telling them what we’re going too do & start doing it quietly. Also we need to stop looking up to black celebrities because they are only out for themselves especially when a white system support them financially.

            • Timothy says:

              @Shanequa

              I agree with you completely. Also, it is better to love our people and express our talents outside of Hollywood anyway. Handling our business quietly is excellent advice.

              • Courtney H. says:

                @ Brother Timothy & Sister Shanequa:

                Thank you both for your comments. I agree with everything that you both said. Here is video about Janet Huber calling out Jada Pinkett Smith:

                Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity. Enjoy! 😀

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            I have listen to Harvey’s video on Janet Hubert. Janet Hubert just keep it real. She outlined her views and said that there are more important issues than an Oscar. He or Harvey is right that we have the right to be angry at injustice and hypocrisy. Jada Pinkett Smith is wrong on the cover issue. Also, there is colorism against Janet Hubert since she is a beautiful dark skinned black woman. Janet Hubert has shown strength. She is a talented dancer and she is involved in theater too. There is a double standard. Whites like Trump (who is a racist and a sexist) can speak their minds, but when black people speak their minds, black people are criticized unfairly. We certainly need more films that show black men and black women loving each other and caring for each other. In the final analysis, we shouldn’t ally with award shows who disrespect us. Harvey made many great points about acting and the strength of Sister Janet Hubert (who was mistreated by Will Smith). We know that Hollywood is notorious for its lack of diversity and for its bigotry. We are in a war for liberation.

            Thank you Sister for showing the video. 🙂

            • Courtney H. says:

              @ Brother Timothy:

              Thank you for watching the two videos and for the compliments 😉 ! I greatly appreciate it!

              I agree with everything that you said about both videos. The video that Harvey did about Cicero and itS racism I’d very eye-opening. Harvey’S remembrances about his family in Chicago and Cicero were extremely interesting. I like it when he reminisces like that. I liked the fact that he pointed out certain people in the video and stated that they may still may be alive. We have to remember that racists raise racist children, and those children grow uo to be racist, too.

              Again, thank you for watching the videoS and commenting.

              May have a good evening, Brother.

        • Timothy says:

          @Sister Shanequa

          You’re Welcome Sister.

  9. dieva says:

    Thanks for the articles. I have a degree in teaching but have yet to put it to use for this reason. I did not want to teach a bunch of Black students about European literature or history. What I really want to do and what I am going to do once I have my own children is set up a type of homeschooling daycare based on Afro studies and not Euro studies. I want to teach Black student how to build their communities and how to make their money work for them. This could only work under my own institution and not a White one since I would probably get fired with swiftness if I attempted this at a White institution.

  10. Kelile says:

    I have not been able to get in on the lovely discussion about the Oscars because I had spent family business to attend to but the comments are very insightful. I wanted to post a link to a YouTube video that speaks to how deep on braintrashing is as a people. Whites have trained us so successfully to hate ourselves they have made it so we ust be very careful sometimes dealing with our own people. This video is of a black fbi agent telling of his clandestine operations to destroy the Black liberation movement.

    LIKE IT IS: BLACK SPY TELLS ALL: http://youtu.be/VgONeO_NvGo

    • Timothy says:

      @Kelile

      Thank you for showing the link. First, Gil Noble is a legend. I head of him for years even though I’m a young’in. The FBI (not just the CIA since people know the terrorism of the CIA) is a terrorist organization to put it bluntly. They used illegal methods to fight against the black liberation struggle. We should treat each other right as black people. The FBI always recruit people in military intelligence, etc. Also, the FBI and other agencies have technology years in advance in what is shown today. So, the enemy is ever slick. It is an eye opening video.

  11. Courtney H. says:

    @ Everybody:

    Here is a really interesting video:

    Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity. Enjoy! 😀

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      I have listened to the video from Harvey on Dr. King, Cicero, etc.

      I remember the Internet of the 1990’s. I used it. Back then, most of the Internet was found in libraries, schools, and universities. I first used the Internet in 1994. I am a Millennial. Today, we have many sick, evil people who want to harm innocent human life. So, we have to advance safety and find solutions to problems in schools, etc. Some Millennials are self centered and this should change. Many young white folks are acting out in many evils. In Cicero in 1966, those events in the video show the viciousness of white racism (which was expressed by many Polish, Lithuanians, Italians, etc.). The people who marched was part of the 1966 Chicago movement, which wanted to fight to end housing discrimination, poverty, slums, racism, and police brutality. SCLC, CCCO, and other groups were involved in the Chicago movement. Harvey is right that the events of the past still continue in the present. So, the video is an eye opener. Harvey gave great information on the history of the Chicago area and the suburbs. Jesse Jackson worked in the Chicago campaign too. Jesse Jackson wanted to work more in the private sector while Dr. King questioned capitalism and sympathized with democratic socialism by his own words.

      From 1966 to the present is not a long time ago. As for nonviolence, I believe in nonviolence and self defense. I believe in both. The is a time to be nonviolent and there is a time to use self defense. The unarmed black people continue to be killed by crooked cops. After the Chicago movement, Dr. King became more revolutionary in his views of Black Power, imperialism, etc. Also, money isn’t everything. We want power, but not the type of power to be like exploitative capitalists exploiting black poor people. We want power to liberate people and end capitalist exploitation period. We want the system of racism/white supremacy to end, so a system of justice can exist. We want wealth to be fairly distributed and imperialism to end. We want economic rights, universal health, and freedom.

      Than you for showing the video that describes facts about important issues Sister. 🙂

  12. Courtney H. says:

    @ Everybody:

    Here is a good video:

    Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity.

    Here is a good podcast:

    http://www.tariqradio.com/main/ep115-negro-bed-wenches-working-overtime

    This contains a lot of profanity, too. Enjoy! 😀

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      I have listened to Harvey’s video and the Tariq Nasheed podcast.

      My view is that Stacey Dash have sold out a long time ago. Stacey is wrong on many levels. First, promoting Black History Month and promoting black owned channels have nothing to do with advancing segregation. Segregation is a group of unjust laws that restricted the human rights of black people. Segregation was organized by white supremacists to restrict the human rights and opportunities of black people. Also, many non-blacks have been awarded in the BET awards and even the Image Awards. So, she is wrong. When we promote black institutions, we don’t want Jim Crow segregation. We want justice, independence and liberation. Independence is superior to segregation and token integration (which given token power to mostly the black rich and upper middle class). Also, BET is not owned by black people at all, so it is not based on any segregation anyway.

      Black History Month was created by Carter G. Woodson to combat white supremacist ideals and teach people about the great history plus culture of black people. Also, black people have always exposed the lack of diversity and racism in Hollywood. Stacey Dash was in Mo Money too, so she knows better than this. She doesn’t criticize Hispanic networks, Asian Museums, and Hispanic History Month. I saw discrimination and racism in Virginia constantly and I’m much younger than her. President Obama didn’t originate he racism in Hollywood. Many in black Hollywood have sold out too in following the interests of white supremacists. Harvey is right to say that Jay Z refused to expose the racial profiling in Barneys in NYC. Racism is real in the world. So, Stacey Dash not only insults the black community, but this person is a total sellout like Jesse Lee Peterson, Larry Elder, etc. As for Tariq Nasheed, he is right to disagree with the insulting views of Stacey Dash. Now, I don’t agree with Harvey and Tariq calling her out of her name.

      Yet, Stacey Dash should be called out for her anti-black statements. Tariq is right that Stacey is just showing white supremacist talking points. Steve Doocy interviewed Dash and played slick, but Doocy is in on it. Stacey Dash follows a far right agenda which is embraced by Trump, and GOP extremists (who talk about being tough on crime, tough on the social safety net, etc. as a coded way for them to harm the human rights of black people as explained by Tariq). Both Democrats and Republicans have done evil. Sanders is wrong to oppose reparations. I’m not surprised at the Oscars showing only white candidates being nominated. I agree with Tariq on exposing the George Washington (who was a brutal slave owner and he passed the Slave Fugitive Act. In the near future, I’m going to do more research on the Revolutionary War and its relation to black people. Many of these white supremacists centuries ago raped black people and caused children to be born) children’s book that was recently banned. White slave owners are demonic and sick. Slavery should never be glamorized at all. I salute black people who fought to end slavery and the Maafa once and for all. So, we believe in black liberation and human justice. We love Africa and blackness completely.

      We believe in supporting building up black institutions and we believe in Black Power forever.

      So, thank you for showing the video and the podcast Sister.

      • Courtney H. says:

        @ Brother Timothy:

        You’re welcome. Thank you for watching the video and listening to the podcast. Both of them were very interesting and both Harvey and Tariq covered a lot of the same “territory”, if you will.

        I will not add to your statements, because I agree with everything that you said. It’s obvious that Harvey and Tariq have the same views on these issues; it sounded like they were on the same wavelength. 😉

        We are on a winter storm advisory here in the ATL, so I did some grocery shopping earlier today — and so did everybody else. Kroger was a madhouse!

        Have a blessed weekend, Brother.

        • Timothy says:

          @Sister Courtney

          Good Afternoon Sister.

          I certainly agree with you. Both Harvey and Tariq agreed a lot on the Oscars issue. Where I’m from in Virginia, it has snowed and many places have been closed early. It has been cold today. It is certainly a perfect time to look at a DVD at home. I’m glad that you gotten your groceries Sister. Thank you for your kind words like always.

          Have a Blessed Weekend too Sister. 🙂

          • Courtney H. says:

            @ Brother Timothy:

            Good Evening.. A lot of places closed early today down here, too. A lot of churches, synogogues, mosques, and other places have cancelled events this weekend as well. It has been cold down here, too. It snowed a little here this afternoon, but it didn’t stick.

            I agree that this is perfect movie-watching weather. 😉

            Have a great weekend, Brother. 🙂

  13. Courtney H. says:

    @ Everybody:

    Check this out:

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      I have listened to the whole video from Harvey. Here are my thoughts. He made many great points about the 2 cowardly white racists and the Oscars. Gerald Molen is totally wrong and sick to disrespect the legitimate exposure of the racism of Hollywood. Hollywood is racist and Molen having connections to the Academy Awards proves our points completely. Molen talked about Michael Moore since Moore talks about racial issues in a way that he disagrees with. Molen is of the far right. He’s also a Mormon, and Mormons never placed black people in the priesthood until 1978. Michael Moore’s political views have nothing to do with this issue. If you listen to many of these white racists, then they will come out as a bigot in public. Also, this coward Gerald Molen (he grew up on Montana) called people “spoiled brats” who are crying about racism. Racism is real. People have been killed because of racism in society. So, for Gerald to dismiss the reality of racism in Hollywood shows his total arrogance and callous attitude which is representative of racists like him. Gerald Molen has financed Dinesh D’Souza’s faux documentary about Obama. Dinesh is known self hater who ignores the evils of colonialism and imperialism in the world. Dinesh actually defends colonialism in Africa and in India, so he is an enemy of black people and all people of color. He’s a disgrace. Dinesh committed adultery. In May 2014, D’Souza pleaded guilty to one felony count of making illegal contributions in the names of others.

      He or Molen produced Schindler’s List, so he should know better. The Holocaust involved the murder of millions of Jewish people, black people, the handicapped, etc. because of racist, bigoted motivations. I have seen Malcolm X and Schindler’s List too. Both films show how vicious bigotry is and how we have the right to stand up against racism no matter what. Spike Lee have talked about the Oscar for over 2 decades. Hollywood is not as progressive as people think it is. Hollywood has promoted sexism, racism, classism, imperialism, etc. in their movies, etc. since its inception. The comments from Charlotte are disrespectful and racist too. She lied and believed that people are by and large accepted in society. That’s false Racism is an institutionalized problem in the wold that must be addressed not by tokenism, but by the end of the system of racism/white supremacy to be replaced with the system of justice. We need revolutionary change. Standing up against racism as found in Hollywood has nothing to do with promoting racial hatred. It is about telling the truth. Racists always try to change the subject or ignore real issues. She is very racist. In France, there is discrimination and racism. The bombings in France were evil and I express sympathy for the innocent victims who died in Paris.

      Also, I do realize that the leadership of France (for decades and centuries) have a long legacy of imperialism, xenophobia, and other evils. So, we should build up our own. These white bigots (they don’t criticize Asian community enters, Jewish advocacy group, Hispanic organizations, but they want to criticize black people when we stand up for something real) have no respect for black people and they have inferiority complexes. When you look at Molen and Charlotte’s demeanor and eyes, you can see their evil. They readily steal our culture and lie about our history. That is why black people should always support black institutions. Our wealth should be cultivated to develop our communities and we should help the black poor plus the black working class. We can’t be free unless we fight to defeat poverty. We desire pan-African unity too. That means that we are in solidarity with our black Brazilians, our Afro-Caribbeans, etc. worldwide. We don’t need to beg anyone for our freedom. We should fight for our freedom by self-determination, social activism, Black Unity, and community development.

      Thank you for showing the video Sister.

      Bless You 🙂

  14. Courtney H. says:

    @ Everybody:

    Here is an interesting video:

    Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity. Enjoy! 😀

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney.

      The video from the Brother is interesting.

      He spoke the truth about RZA’s recent comments. RZA is from NYC and he knows that there is an epidemic of unfair police harassment of people going on long before hoodies and hip hop existed. The police will kill anyone irrespective of how a person dresses or talk. Regardless of how we dress or talk, we deserve to have the same human rights as anyone else. RZA talked about respectability politics. I don’t agree with respectability politics, because the system of injustice must end via courageousness, strength, and not submission to the whims of white mainstream society. History has proved time after time again that mimicking white racist society is not liberation. Liberation is about us standing up for our own values and dignity as human beings. Liberation is about mental liberation in seeing each other as allies and as Brothers and Sisters united in a common goal of establishing justice. Dr. King wore a suit and tie constantly, but he was arrested plenty of times for being against unjust laws. Fannie Lou Hamer (who was a strong black woman with great human character) was beaten by the police unjustly. The Brother also made a great point about Emmett Till too. He’s right that we need more of that spirit of unity in the black community today as it had existed decades ago. These events (of abuse of black people during the civil rights era of the 1960’s, etc.) existed long before modern hip hop came about. Mainstream hip hop was invented in the 1970’s by Kool Herc.

      Much of the modern music has been infiltrated by corporate people and much of that music lack a revolutionary ethos as found readily in music decades ago. That is why many songs today talk about nihilism, distraction, and degrading black people without enlightening commentaries about society. Some artists are showing amazing music today too. Therefore, a dress code will not curtail police harassment and police brutality. Police brutality ends when laws are changed, when structures of society change, and when unjust police occupation in our communities ends. It also ends when black people are treated as human beings in society. There are many sellouts in the world and many black people are doing what is right as well. We believe in the love of family and other concepts of joy and resiliency. We have hope, faith, and we believe in doing positive action in helping black people. Thank you for showing the video Sister.

      Enjoy your Weekend. 🙂

  15. Courtney H. says:

    @ Everybody:

    Here’s another good video:

    Warning — this video contains a lot of profanity. Enjoy! 😀

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      The video from Solomon certainly shows that celebrities aren’t infallible and we have to rely on our own power to solve our own power. I agree with him that we can’t beg celebrities for freedom. Many of them have let us down. So, it is important for us to establish the truth and stand up for our rights.

      • Courtney H. says:

        @ Brother Timothy:

        Thank you for watching the videos and making comments. I agree with everything that you said.

        @ Everybody:

        Here are two videos about RZA:

        Warning — these videos contain a lot of profanity.

  16. Sharon53 says:

    @everyone
    Please listen to this video with Minister Farrakhan and Alex Jones. It is pretty long, almost 2 hours.:
    http://financialjuneteenth.com/watch-min-louis-farrakhan-has-a-powerful-conversation-with-alex-jones/

    • Timothy says:

      @Sharon53

      Hello Sister.

      Alex Jones has disrespected Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and other Brothers and Sisters. He has outlined support for a bigots like Donald Trump (who has disrespected the Central Park Five, he has made sexist remarks, he wants all Muslims to not come into America, etc.), Nugent, etc. So, my views are well known about the far right Jones. Now, both people have the right to have a discussion if they want to. I believe in freedom of speech. What I don’t believe in is that black people must accept Jones’ ideologies then we will all be free. We have the right to have independent thinking. Obviously, Farrakhan has much more intellectual mind than Alex Jones. That is why Farrakhan made more accurate points about society and race than Alex Jones. At the end of the day, the system of white supremacy/racism must end in order for a system of justice to exist.

      Thank you for your words Sister.

  17. Sharon53 says:

    @ Timothy,
    Thanks for your comments. I also share your thoughts on Alex Jones. Regardless to what he says, he is still a white supremacist. Sometimes, I will listen to what Jones and his kind has to say, because they may provide some information that I can use. Perhaps that is the reason why Minister Farrakhan had the dialogue with him also.

    • Timothy says:

      @Sharon53

      You’re Welcome Sister.

      I totally agree with you. Alex Jones is a notorious white supremacist (he has smeared many people who promote Black Lives Matter) who glamorizes white supremacists and liars like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Black people and Native Americans were the victims of genocide by the racists (who were controlled by the European capitalist oligarchy centuries ago). What you are describing is to the eat the meat (or learn information that is useful) and throw away the bones (or the agenda of Alex Jones). Louis Farrakhan has great knowledge of history and culture. We, as black people, will continue to fight for the truth.

      Have a Blessed Day Sister.

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Courtney

      Good Afternoon Sister Courtney 🙂

      I read the story from the Haitian American Sister. It was an emotional story. We are black Americans and we love pan-African unity. Racists will always try to divide black people based on nationality while we believe in unity irrespective of our nationalities as black people. We have cultural differences among Africans, Afro-Brazilians, etc. but we are one people. We have one origin and we are in the human family. This point is shown in the article. We can respect our different cultures and honor the unity of our people at the same time. Black Americans should never be slandered as we have made excellent contributions in science, legal affairs, math, philosophy, engineering, computer science, etc. just like Afro-Caribbeans, Africans, etc. have done. I am happy for the Haitian Sister. Haitian black heroes defeated the French and the English during the Haitian Revolution. Haiti was the first black Republic of the Americas which was created in 1804. Thank you for showing the article.

      • Epi says:

        @ Timothy:

        I could not agree more. Divide us more as black folk with the Omni-present color caste system? Moreover, the numbers of Blacks that actually base one’s “worth” on color, when the real culprit behind this is white supremacy. Yet, many Blacks can’t or refuse to see this.

        How SAD the numbers of Blacks that really perceive this as whether one is accepted by their own Black people or not when we are ALL seen equally under the same microscope of white supremacy and hatred…smh…

        Phazex_Female

        • Timothy says:

          @Phazex_Female

          You’re right Sister.

          The more that I learn about the African Diaspora, the stronger that I feel emotionally and spiritually. Right now, Afro-Colombians are fighting for political rights and economic autonomy. Right now, Afro-Brazilians are in the streets fighting against police brutality, sexism, and racism in Brazil. The struggle continues and we will struggle for our liberation by any means necessary. Some black people unfortunately fail to see the real enemy, which is racism/white supremacy (and the white supremacists themselves, who use colorism, the evil caste system, etc. to advance their nefarious, perverted agendas). We believe in righteousness, justice, and pan-African unity. Our people have been in the forefront of change and revolutionary actions since the dawn of human history. We have to educate black youth about their human value and the genius that resides in them. There is a lot of division in the world. We need more Black Unity indeed.

          Thank you for your great commentaries Sister.

          • Courtney H. says:

            @ Brother Timothy & Sister Phazex_Female:

            Thank you for reading the article and commenting. I agree with both of your statements.

            • Timothy says:

              @Sister Courtney

              You’re Welcome Sister.

              Here are some music from our people since music always inspires the soul. Enjoy 🙂

              • Courtney H. says:

                @ Brother Timothy:

                Thank you so much for posting these videos of these talented sisters. Their singing is so uplifting! 🙂

  18. Courtney H. says:

    @ Epi:

    Thank you and you are welcome. And I agree with your statements about teaching and parenting.

      • Timothy says:

        @Sister Courtney

        Thank you for showing both links about Japan and the black victims of the Holocaust. Runoko Rashidi is a great scholar and traveler. I heard of his work since the early 2000’s. There has been a strong black presence in Asia for a long time. The history of the shoguns are very interesting. The article shows that Black Africans traveled the world. The other article about the Holocaust is very important, because many people don’t know that many black people have been the victims of the Holocaust (or the Shoah). We will never forget. The same discrimination against Afro-Germans decades ago is evil. We, as black Americans face gentrification, discrimination, police brutality, etc. in our time too. The other Holocaust in Namibia should be remembered as well. Thank you for showing great information.

        Have a Great Weekend Sister Courtney 🙂

      • Epi says:

        Courtney:

        Thank you for sharing both of the links. I recall reading some years ago that at the 1936 (?) Olympic games, Adolph Hitler, that rabid racist did not even want to shake Jesse Owens hand. Jesse was a black athlete that won in the division of track and field. Though the brother DID deserve accolades for his accomplishment, I see that “white validation,” even then, was the call of the day. But at the Olympic games in 1968, two black athletes that won medals, stood in unity and gave the “black power fist” when the Star Spangled Banner was played. Now THAT was a moment of pride!

        Thank you Sister,

        Phazex_Female

        • Courtney H. says:

          @ Brother Timothy & Sister Phazex_Female:

          You’re welcome and thank you both for reading the links and commenting. I agree with everything that you said. The story about the Black Shogun and the Black victims of the Holocaust need to be remembered.

          There is an upcoming film entitled “Race” (with the double meaning) about Jesse Owens’ performance at the Berlin 1936 Olympics (you can look it up on http://www.imdb.com). I’m glad that you brought up the protest at the Mexico City 1968 Olympics. That’s a story that needs to be remembered, too.

          May you both have a blessed weekend! 🙂

          • Timothy says:

            @Sister Courtney

            You’re Welcome Sister

            I saw commercials about the movie called race. Jesse Owens has a long life. His victories in the berlin Olympics refuted the myth of white racial superiority. The 1968 Olympics with black track athletes showing the black fists in the air was courageous and great. It showed the world that black people will stand up for our human rights. It was during the time of the Black Power movement.

            @Sister Phazex_Female

            I agree with you. The black power salute was historic and righteous in 1968. Jesse Owens became more progressive on racial issues on 1972. This was when he wrote his book “I Have Changed” when he understood more about the evil system of racism/white supremacy. He wrote the following:

            “I realized now that militancy in the best sense of the word was the only answer where the black man was concerned, that any black man who wasn’t a militant in 1970 was either blind or a coward.”
            –from his 1972 book: I Have Changed

            The story of the Brothers who put the fist up in 1968 (in Mexico City) was a great story of courage.

            Enjoy you Weekend Sister.

  19. Sharon53 says:

    @everyone:
    I thought the following was worth sharing. Please give your thoughts on this.
    http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/high-mortality-rates-for-middle-aged-whites-in-geo/nqFqB/

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Sharon53

      Hello Sister

      Thank you for showing all of the links. The truth is that middle aged white middle men are increasingly dying of diseases because of many reasons like economic reasons, job problems, some whites can’t adjust to new realities, etc. Many of the super wealthy whites could care less about poor whites as long as they are making money (on many cases making money off the deaths of people in general). Black people are known for coping to problems while many white folks are committing suicide, etc. The positive stats about black people refutes the myth of white superiority. We, as black people, are known for our resiliency. We love our blackness 100 percent. So, we have to use discernment and promote healthy living. The link about black Kindergarten students was an eye opener. Any black child needs education, love, and respect. That story is why it is so important for black youth to be taught about black history, black culture, and about the vicious, evil system of racism/white supremacy. Great people have worked with black students all of the time. These kids aren’t criminals or thugs. They are human beings. The micoaggressions must end and many evil people have biases that cause them to even unfairly suspend black students all of the time. The story of a white man playing Michael Jackson is ridiculous. Michael Jackson’s father, mother, sisters, and brothers are black people. Michael Jackson was a black man. So, that movie plays into the agenda of white supremacy where white racists want to mock the suffering of the hurting black man Michael Jackson (who recently passed away). Whitewashing talented black artists is the M.O. of these bigots. That movie is disrespectful to Michael Jackson’s family and black people in general.

      Have a Blessed Weekend Sister.

      God Bless you.

      • Shanequa says:

        @ Timothy
        Please give your opinion on this topic because another black child died in the hands of law enforcement. Gynnya McMillen, may the young sister rest in the hands of our ancestors. I have become so pissed off with the police brutality that’s happening to our people. I’m evening more upset that black police officers are not speaking out about this situation, in which I held all of them accountable for this as well, since they support a system that is against their people. When I ask black cops about the police brutality against our people they are so simple minded, these clowns will make so many excuses without thinking logical. Black police officers put on a uniform & walk around with a badge thinking their robo cop but when the system they support & work for turn against them they are ready to speak out are take on a lawsuit.

        http://www.cbsnews.com/news/audio-cpr-started-11-minutes-after-staff-found-gynnya-mcmillen/

        • Timothy says:

          @Sister Shanequa

          Hello Sister. The passing of the young Sister is a tragedy. Gynnya McMillen will be missed, but her memory will never be forgotten. I’m furious at this situation since a young Sister was blatantly mistreated and disrespected at multiple levels. It doesn’t have to take 11 minutes to start CPR procedures in this incident. Also, the Sister should have never experienced an Aikido restraint in the first place when she wasn’t violent at all. She wasn’t a direct threat to anyone. She refused a request and the article has stated that other actions can be used to rectify the situation. Many black people in juvenile facilities are assaulted, raped, and placed into solitary confinement (some forms of solitary confinement are banned now). So, it is a vicious cycle where black youth are stigmatized, abused, and murdered in many cases. This situation relates to the school to prison pipeline system where many black children are unfairly suspended (because of racist anti-black biases, etc.), sent to juvenile, and some are sent into prison. Of course, the black officers rarely speak up about these issues unless the officer is retired, etc. Some black offices have more allegiance to blue than to their own people. It’s a shame. There is an investigation going on and we know how the racists will try to sugarcoat what happened. Gynnya was treated callously and without regard to her human dignity. The family deserve answers, prayers, and condolences.

          Thank you Sister for showing the link.

  20. Sharon53 says:

    @Everyone:
    I wanted to share this. I thought it was heart-breaking:
    http://thereelnetwork.net/a-kindergarteners-question-will-break-your-heart-and-open-your-eyes/
    Also, check out the following link; absolutely unbelievable.
    http://thereelnetwork.net/outrage-erupts-as-movie-casts-white-actor-to-play-michael-jackson/

    • Courtney H. says:

      @ Sister Sharon53:

      Thank you for providing the links. I agree with Brother Timothy in his response. It is sad that Black children have such low self-esteem. Our children are taught from Day One that they are inferior and have not contributed anything to society. That is why we have make sure that we supplement public education with teaching our children about our culture and history at home, or in ethnic schools (like the Jews, the Chinese, the Koreans, etc. do). It will solve a lot of our problems, since children are the future of our people.

      Again, thank you for providing the links.

    • Shanequa says:

      @ Sharon53
      What the young black kindergartener child is stating, is what a lot of black children I have work with are thinking & stating the same thing. Our black children is seeing so many negative factors in their lives including racism their not seeing positive changes in their lives nor within our culture. When you’re constantly being attack with racism, it’s very hard trying to keep your self-esteem high & have a positive mind.

    • Shanequa says:

      @ Sharon53
      Michael Jackson was a great entertainer but he had many self hate issues. He stated in a interview he wanted someone black to play him & he’s proud of being black I question all of this. Michael has been trying for many years to get white validation, surgically destroying his dark skin & African features and passing down his wealth to non black children whose going to marry their own people. Michael Jackson was the poster child for black self hate that was annoyed by our community because we overlook his self hate issues but look more to his talent.

      • Sharon53 says:

        @ Shanequa
        Thanks for your comments on Michael Jackson. I liked the Jackson 5 in the early days, but after Michael went solo, I did not really follow his career, so I never kept up with anything in his personal life also. Over the years, I did hear about some of the things you wrote in your post about him and you summed him up to a T. Being the poster child for black self-hate is very befitting for him and sadly so many of us are so star-struck we overlook this important aspect of his life.

        However, I still do not like the idea of a white person playing a black person. I am concerned that when they start doing things like that, it is the evidence of things to come. Before long, one of them will attempt to star in a movie about our real heroes like Malcolm X or Marcus Garvey. I have never heard in history of the situation being the other way around, where a black person played a white hero or even a white non-hero. I doubt very seriously they will allow that.
        However, your comments are on-point as always and thanks for sharing them.

  21. Sharon53 says:

    @Timothy and Courtney H.
    Thanks for your comments.
    It was really heart-breaking reading that about the kindergartner.
    At first I thought the article casting a white man playing Michael Jackson was just a prank. All that I can say is I would not go see a movie with a white man playing Michael Jackson. It is a slap in the face to the black race, and especially to his family.
    On the article about the high mortality rates for middle-aged whites in Georgia and the south, one thought that came into mind is God’s law of sowing and reaping. Not sure where I heard this but I hear that Georgia was the last state to cede to the Union. I hear they fought hard to keep slavery alive. I have not done research on this but it would not surprise me at all.

  22. Sharon53 says:

    @Everyone:
    Please take a look at this video.
    http://yourblackworld.net/2016/01/27/why-nate-parker-has-black-women-hot-and-bothered/
    Based on what these ladies are saying Nate Parker wants to direct and play in a movie about Nat Turner. They seem to be giving him a lot of praise but I am growing tired of these black men married to non-black women starring in movies about our black heroes.

    I hear he is trying to come up with the funds for the movie himself and has done some good things, but I will never accept a black man such as him who was pretty much raised by a single black mother talk about the plight of the black man and then turn around and marry a non-black woman. I understand a lot of this is the trickle-down effect of slavery but I always thought it was natural for a person to be attracted to the opposite sex by what their parents looked like. This just shows how powerful racism/white supremacy is and how it has really messed us up.

    Even more disturbing is how these sisters don’t even mention it. They did mention that he is married so there is the chance they know his wife is non-black. Like a lot of sisters of today, they seem to have a sense of apathy on being dissed by some black men but yet continue to support them.

    I will never support anything where a black person, male or female, disses black people, whether it is a movie, music, anything.

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Sharon53

      I have read your words and I have watched the video from the 2 beautiful black women. First, this story is very personal with me. My maternal ancestors are from Southampton, County, Virginia (which is where Nat Turner was born and where he lived). Nat Turner was executed in Courtland, which is near Suffolk, Virginia. Southampton County is at the Nottoway River. I know about Drewyville, Boykins, and other locations in the county. I have seen forests there and deer. I’ve been out there before. First, America was founded in the genocide of Native Americans and the enslavement of our black ancestors. George Washington and Thomas Jefferson not only enslaved black people, but there were stone cold racists. Manifest Destiny is basically part of the system of white supremacy, which evil people used faux religious and political justifications to steal the lands of the Americas and beyond. So, Nat Turner was a black man who rebelled against tyranny. He was strong and brave.

      Black men, black women, and black children being enslaved, raped, and assaulted by white racists is tyranny. Nat Turner organized with black people to courageously resist white racist tyranny. I only recently knew that Nate Parker married a non-black woman. Since I was child, I heard and knew about the story of Nat Turner. Virginia has a lot of history as it relates to the black freedom struggle. As for Nate Parker’s non-black wife, the person that a man married and has children with signifies what he wants his descendants to look like. It is as simple as that. If a black man wants his descendants to be black, then he will marry a black woman voluntarily and have black children voluntarily. That action is part of the beauty of Black Love. Black women (and black people in general) have every right to not support those who disrespect black people.

      The system of racism/white supremacy is very nefarious and it has harmed our people even in their youths. Nate Parker’s project will probably receive a lot of popularity, but at what cost. What we can do now is to use this opportunity to educate black people on the slave rebellions in the Americas, Africa etc. This is the perfect time to educate our people since Liberation is linked to education (and vice versa). It is something to ponder for a black person to say that they want black families to flourish, but this person is married to a non-black person. We shall see what this movie will consist of. Regardless, I love chocolate forever. A’int nothing will change that.

      Enjoy your Day Sister.

      • Shanequa says:

        @ Timothy & Sharon53
        Both of you made valid good points. I believe this movie will be water down, they do not want a movie that will get the black mind thinking period. If this movie was doing some serious damage they would have did what they done to Sam Greenlee who written the book & produce the movie “The Spook Who Sat By The Door.” Sam Greenlee was put on the FBI list for that book & movie furthermore they ban the movie from being seen in theaters. I read the book & seen the movie but I felt in love with the main character Dan Freeman because he was a black man willing to fight to liberate his people.

        Furthermore I will not pay to go see this movie especially a black man whose not married or dating a black woman will not get my support. Sisters need to stop supporting these black men who love there money but will annoy there beauty as a black woman & not considering them as a mate.

        • Timothy says:

          @Sister Shanequa

          You have made excellent points and I agree with you. The industry doesn’t want revolutionary change in the minds of black people. They want the status quo and sugarcoat the legacy and the actions of our heroes. The truth is that black people rebellions globally against the tyranny of the Maafa and the slavery. You have made a great point about Sam Greenlee’s book. The movie was ahead of its time and it showed the truth about how we must fight for black liberation. Black women have every right to not support those who married a non-black woman or has disrespected black women. That is about using power to defend black interests.

        • Sharon53 says:

          @Shanequa
          Thanks so much for your comments on the movie about Nat Turner. I agree it will be more than likely watered down, just like Red Tails where from what I heard, there were no black women in sight. Also, I heard, they took special care to show a relationship between one of the airmen and an Italian lady and based on what one of the daughters of one of the airmen said, that was unrealistic because things like that did not happen. She further stated the men were kept in closed quarters and watched and he probably would have been court-martialed and publicly hanged just like Emmett Till’s father, who was a soldier in WWII, for allegedly raping an Italian prostitute. I did not know that about Emmett Till’s father until recently, and I can’t imagine what his mother must have gone through losing her husband and only child to this kind of violence.
          Thanks for the history on Sam Greenlee. I did get a chance to see the movie “The Spook Who Sat By The Door” before it was banned. I was very young at the time and not as socially-conscious as I am now but I do remember seeing the movie. I did not know about all the things you stated that happened to Greenlee but I am not surprised in the least bit. Thanks again for keeping us abreast of information like this.

          Black women do need to stop supporting these black men who willingly take our money but refuse to date and marry us. As long as we continue to support them, no matter how much they disses us, not only will they never appreciate us, they will also grow to expect us to continue giving without anything coming back in

        • Epi says:

          @ Shanequa:

          I agree. The problem is that just like “fantasy” in many of the soap operas, movies and such, people should stop and realize that these actors and actresses are playing ROLES and that the roles that they play is not the true character of the actor or actress.

          If I were I regular movie-watcher, you’re right. I would not support these self-serving people with my money.

          Phazex_Female

    • Courtney H. says:

      @ Sister Sharon53:

      Thank you for showing the link. I thought what the sisters had to say was interesting, and they were telling the truth. I also agree with your comments, and those of Brother Timothy, and Sister Shanequa.

  23. Sharon53 says:

    @Timothy
    Thanks for all the information on Nat Turner and Virginia as it relates to the black freedom struggle. It is so refreshing to learn more about our history. It seems the more I learn about our history, it just keeps coming which is a good thing. So much of it has been covered up or distorted but God has a way of making sure it finds its way to us still.

    As far as Nate Parker is concerned, I had never heard of him until I listened to that video. That goes to show how little I am interested in today’s entertainment world. You are so right when you say the person that a man marries and has children with signifies what he wants his descendants to look like. I also agree with you when you state “it is something to ponder for a black person to say that they want black families to flourish, but this person is married to a non-black person.” He is really confused if he thinks the black family can flourish if he is married to a non-black person. Trojan Pam says it so well in her books that “you can’t fight white supremacy while lying down with it at night.”

  24. Epi says:

    This in late, but worth sharing…

    Kelvin Doe – From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Born
    October 26, 1996 (age 19)
    Freetown, Sierra Leone

    Residence
    Freetown

    Nationality
    Sierra Leonean

    Other names
    DJ Focus

    Occupation
    Inventor, radio DJ

    Known for
    building electronics

    Kelvin Doe (born 26 October 1996 in Freetown), also known as DJ Focus, is a Sierra Leonean engineer. He is known for teaching himself engineering at the age of 13 and building his own radio station in Sierra Leone, where he plays music and broadcasts news under the name “DJ Focus.” He was one of the finalists in GMin’s Innovate Salone idea competition, in which Doe built a generator from scrap metals. Doe would constantly use discarded pieces of scrap to build transmitters, generators, and batteries, as well.

    As a result of his accomplishment, he received an invitation to the United States and subsequently became the youngest person to participate in the “Visiting Practitioner’s Program” at MIT.[3][4][5] His accomplishments were documented by @radical.media and presented on their corporate YouTube channel. When the video went viral, the story was picked up by CNN, NBC News, and The Huffington Post.
    Doe subsequently was a speaker at TEDxTeen[8] and lectured to undergraduate engineering students at Harvard College.[9] In May 2013, Doe signed a $100,000 solar project pact with Canadian High Speed Service Provider Sierra WiFi.

    Wonderful! However, I remain hopeful that we will see more achievements like this “in state” as well.

    Phazex_Female

    • Timothy says:

      @Sister Phazex_Female

      Thank you for showing that information Sister. We should know more information about young black people making great accomplishments in the STEM fields.

    • Kelile says:

      @ Epi

      Thank you Sistren for this post. Afrikan genius should be celebrated and shared at all times. Our growth has been severely retarded due to racism/white supremacy. Imagine what could accomplish without the damage of RWS. There is a lecture of Dr Van Sertima I believe it was African Presence in Early Europe on YouTube where he discussed the fact that in the 1400s when whites first started kidnapping Afrikans they discovered that we were on the verge of developing the worlds first computer and thearcheological evidence was there. Imagine if the world had computers back then and how far Afrikans would of be if whites left us alone!

      There us a great PBS doc series called Afropop that profiled a 26 yr old Afrikan inventor. Check the link out:

      Burning in the Sun

      Producer: Cambria Matlow + Morgan Robinson
      Runtime: 56:46
      At a crossroad in life, 26-year-old Daniel Dembélé returns to his homeland of Mali and starts a local business building solar panels. Daniel’s unprecedented goal: to electrify rural communities, 99% of which live without power. Burning in the Sun tells his story of growing the budding idea into a viable company and of Daniel’s impact on his first customers in the tiny village of Banko. Taking controversial stances on climate change, poverty, and African self-sufficiency, the film explores what it means to grow up as a man, and what it takes to prosper as a nation.

      Website: http://burninginthesun.wordpress.com/

      http://afropop.tv/burning-in-the-sun-episode/?i=2

      Much love and maximum respect to you and Brother Timothy.

      Kelile

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